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EGGS, 



How to Use Them. 



A GUIDE FOR THE PREPARATION OF EGGS IN MORE 
THAN FIVE HUNDRED DIFFERENT STYLES 
WITH SOME REFERENCE TO THEIR'" 
IMPORTANCE IN THE PAST 
AND PRESENT TIMES. 



•BY 



ADOLPHE MEYER, M.C.A. 

Author of ''The Post-Graduated Cookery Book," "Dainty Dishes" etc. 



PUBLISHED BY THE CATERER PUBLISHING CO., 

New York. 

third edition. 



TO 

ALL, WHO ACKNOWLEDGE 

THEIR INDEBTEDNESS TO THE EGG; 

THIS BOOK IS DEDICATED. 



Copyright, 1898, by Adolphe Meyes. 



A Chat With the Reader. 



'T'HIS modest little book scarcely deserves the dignity 
of a formal preface. Indeed, it seems as though 
prefaces have gone out of fashion in recent years, though 
they have been proved very useful to authors desirous of 
placing themselves and their subject on a proper footing 
with their readers, before the latter begin the task of 
critically examining their literary wares. 

In the present instance, the writer has ventured to call 
attention to the prominent part which that most common 
yet most useful article of diet, the egg, has played in the 
development of the science and art of cookery, ever since 
primeval man first realized the possibilities of fire and 
water in the proper preparation of food. These pages 
also contain a complete guide, showing the many differ- 
ent ways in which the egg can be treated, so as to please 
the eye as well as the palate. It can be justly 'claimed 
for the egg that it is as popular among the vast multitude 
of those who merely eat to live, as it is with that select 
brotherhood of bon vivants, who only live to eat. 

When all is said, however, the egg must stand alone 

upon its intrinsic merits. Like woman, when an egg is 

good, there is nothing better; when it is bad, there is 

nothing worse. 

The Author. 



INDEX. 



A Chat with the Reader 3 

A Historical, Theoretical and Practical Chapter on Eggs, s 

Friar O'Meara's Song 23 

Part II 25 

Boiled Eggs 26 

Poached Eggs , 28 

Eggs Mollet 45 

Scrambled Eggs So 

Shirred Eggs 



\ 



59 
Eggs au Miroir 

Fmed Eggs 67 

Eggs in Cocottes or Cases 72 

Eggs Moulded iisr Timeales 78 

Hard Ecgs \ 

Stuffed Eggs > 81 

Cold Eggs J 

Omelets 93 

Sweet Omelets 109 

Sweet Eggs 114 

Miscellaneous Recipes 118 

Egg Drinks 124 

Mulled Wine^ with Eggs (Poem) 127 

Books of Reference 128 



PART I. 



A Historical, Theoretical and Practical 
Chapter on E^^s. 

IN all times and in all ages, among all races and in all 
lands, as far back as written history and tradition 
can be traced, the egg has ever been regarded as chief 
among Nature's most precious gifts to mankind. 

This universal popularity has been due not merely to 
the fact that the egg is found in every corner of the 
earth, and that it is a most wholesome and nutritious 
article of food, but also to the additional and very im- 
portant fact that it is continuously and abundantly re- 
produced, ready for immediate use, without the aid or 
assistance of those who benefit by its production. 

Famous cooks, in the past as well as the present, have 
been fully aware how much they are indebted to the egg, 
in the creation of the various sauces and delicacies that 



6 Egg^, o.nd How to Use Them. 

have made their reputation as masters in the art of cook- 
ery. In fact, without the aid of eggs, the artistic cook 
would have to abandon his profession in despair. 

In ancient times the life-giving quality of the egg was 
recognized by the philosophers of those days, who re- 
garded it as the symbol of awakening life, and many 
of them advised their disciples and followers to abstain 
from the use of eggs as food, so as not to destroy the 
germ which Nature had destined for the production of a 
new life. The e^g was also regarded as an emblem of 
the material world, representing the four elements which 
compose it, as follows: — the shell indicating the earth; 
the white, water; the yolk, fire; and the capula (between 
shell and white) being typical of the air. 

Hutchinson, in, his history of Northumberland, says: 
"The egg was held by Egyptians as a sacred emblem of 
the renovation of mankind after the deluge. The Jews 
adapted it to suit the circumstances of their history, as a 
type of their departure from the land of Egypt, and it 
was used in the feast of the Passover as a part of the 
furniture of the table, with the Pascal lamb." 

Greeks and Romans used eggs in their sacrifices, and 
carried them with great pomp, in honor of Ceres, the 
Goddess of Agriculture. 

Pliny, in his natural history, tells the story of Livia, 
the wife of Nero, who, during her pregnancy, consulted 
a fortune teller; and the latter advised her: "Warm in 
your bosom a new-laid tgg until hatched; if a male 
chicken comes forth, thank the Gods, who will grant you 
a son." The Empress followed the advice, as given, 
with the result that her wish was gratified, as she gave 
birth to Tiberius. Her example was followed by many 
of the foremost women of Rome, greatly to the amuse- 
ment of those who watched these proud matrons devote 
themselves to the incubation of chickens. 

Once upon a time eggs played an important part in 
the interpretation of dreams, as is shown by the following 
legend: A man, who dreamed that he had eaten an 
egg, consulted a soothsayer, and that wise man informed 
him that the white of the tgg signified that the dreamer 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. ■ 7 

would, before long, come into the possession of some sil- 
ver, and the yolk meant that he would soon receive some 
goM. The fortunate dreamer soon afterward received a 
legacy consisting partly of those two precious metals. 
He hastened to thank the fortune teller, and offered him 
a piece of silver. "This is very well for the white," said 
the latter, "but is there naught for the yolk?" 

Athenaeus mentions a certain Nichomachus, who said, 
"My father left me very little property. In a few months 
I made it as round as an egg; and, then breaking the 
shell, I made but one gulpi of it." This shows clearly 
that the ancients were partial to soft boiled eggs. 

The Romans were very fond of new laid eggs, which 
formed the first course of every dinner. 

They, asserted that it was necessary to remain at table 
"from the egg to the apple," if one wished to maintain 
himself in health. Hence the adage, "ab ovo usque ad 
mala," or "from the beginning to the end." 

In speaking of this fcustom, the author of the Tabella 
Cibaria cynically remarks, "This expression, 'ab ovo'— 
from the beginning — alludes also to those prolix narrators 
who would begin the history of the siege of Troy by 
recalling the circumstance of Castor and Pollux, as well 
as Helen and Clytemnestra, having been hatched out of 
Leda's egg." This fable is thus aluded to in the Hexa- 
meter: "Pollux and Castor were hatched out of a cou- 
ple of eggs," says our poet (Horace), "yet, you boldly 
call for them, as if you were not afraid of finding there, 
not the Dioscuri, but some Jialf-formed chickens." 

It was a Roman custom to mark the beginning of the 
New Year, which then occurred in March, by presents 
of bright colored eggs in honor of Castor and Pollux. 
This custom still prevails in some countries on New 
Year's Day, but 'it is more commonly followed during 
Easter tide. The eggs are then often made of sugar, 
chocolate, or pasteboard covered with silk, and richly 
decorated with artificial flowers, and, sometimes, they 
have presents of considerable value inside of them. 

Brand, in his Popular Antiquities, has much to say 
as to the origin of Easter eggs. He quotes from Douce's 



8 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 

manuscript notes as follows: "The author of Le Voya- 
geur a Paris supposes that the practice of painting and 
decorating eggs at Easter among the Catholics arose 
from the joy which was occasioned by their returning 
to their favorite food after so long an abstinence from 
them during Lent." 

Elsewhere he speaks of Emilianne's Frauds of Romish 
Monks and Priests, in which are found the following 
passages : "Oh Easter Eve and Easter Day all the heads 
of families send great chargers full of hard eggs to the 
church to get them blessed, which the priests perform by 
saying several appointed prayers, and making great signs 
of the cross over them and sprinkling them with water. 
The priest, having finished the ceremony, demands how 
many dozen eggs there be in every basin." 

"These blessed eggs have the virtue of sanctifying 
the entrails of the body, and are to be the first fat or 
fleshy nourishment they take after the abstinence of 
Lent. The Italians do not only abstain from flesh during 
Lent, but also from eggs, cheese, biitter and all white 
meats. As soon as the eggs are blessed, every one car- 
ries his portion home, and causeth a large table to be set 
in tfee best room in the house, which they cover with 
their best linen, all bestrewed with flowers, and place 
around it a dozen dishes of meat and the great charger 
of eggs in the midst. 'Tis a very pleasant sight to see 
these tables set forth in the houses of great persons, when 
they expose on side tables (round about the chamber) 
all the plates that they have in the house, and whatever 
else they have that is rich and curious, in honor of their 
Easter eggs, which of themselves yield a very fair show, 
for the shells of them are all painted with divers colors 
and gilt. Sometimes there are no less than twenty dozen 
in the same charger, neatly laid together in the form of 
a pyramid. The table continues in the same posture, 
covered all the Easter week, and aH those that came to 
visit them, in that time, were invited to eat an Easter 
egg with them, which they must not refuse." 

As a regular article of diet, eggs, and especially hens' 
eggs, have always been appreciated. The long shaped 



EggSj and How to Use Them. 9 

eggs were considered the best, and to give better nour- 
ishment, as they were cock-eggs (that is, a cock would 
"be hatched from them). The Romans did not confine 
themselves to hen's eggs, but they sought those of the 
partridge and pheasant, and Quintus Hortensius intro- 
.<iuced the use of peafowls' eggs. 

Galen, the first known of physicians, considered those 
of the partridge and the pheasant as the most delicate. 

Dr. Muffett, in his quaint book. Health's Improvement, 
published in London in 1655, has the following to say 
as to the choice of eggs : 

"First ; that they be rather Pullet's eggs, than laid by 
an old Hen. 

"Secondly; that they be not self-begotten, but gotten 
by the Cock upon the Hen. 

"Thirdly; that they be new, white and long; for such 
eggs nourish plentifully, and quickly clear the voice and 
"breast, strengthen the stomach, recover men out of con- 
sumption, and increase nature so much that in continu- 
ance of time they make us wanton. They nourish quick- 
ly, because they are nothing but liquid flesh ; they nourish 
much, because their heat and moisture is proportionable 
Tinto ours. They are wholesomest in the morning, because 
they are then newest. They are best in winter, because hens 
are then fattest, strongest, and best relished; they are 
worst in summer, because hens feed then upon flies, snails, 
cadlocks, and many ill weeds, which rather scours than 
nourishes their bodies. They are best being eaten alone, 
because mingling with other meats, they corrupt the 
stomach, filling men's faces with pimples, morphens and 
freckles. They are ill for young children (especially be- 
ing often eaten), for that their bodies turn them' into 
over hot nourishment, whence itch, scabs, inflammations 
and corruptions do arise. They are also bad for old 
men, because they are hardly digested of a cold stomach. 
Fittest they are for temperate young persons, and such 
as are consumed without any notable fever." 

The learned doctor thus discourses upon the digesti- 
"bility of eggs : "A rare &gg anyway dressed is lightest 
of digestion"; a hard tgg is most rebellious ; an &gg be- 



10 Eggs, OAid Hoiv to Use Them. 

twixt both is of strongest nourishment. Eggs poached 
into water, or verjuice, are fittest for hot complexions, 
or men distempered with agues ; sodden rare in the shell, 
they are soonest converted into blood; but being rare 
roasted in embers they make thickest and strongest blood, 
and are fittest for weak, cold and waterish stomachs." 

In those days, strange as it may seem at this time, it 
was customary to roast eggs. John Dryden, the old Eng- 
lish poet, tells in rhyme of — ■ 

"New laid eggs, with Baucis' busy care 
Turned by a gentle fire, and roasted rare." 

This custom is thus alluded to in Tabella Cibaria: "In 
countries where wood fire is constantly used, the cot- 
tager half buries his eggs in an upright position in hot 
ashes, upon the hearth, and when a clear dew drop oozes 
on the top of the shell the eggs are fit to be eaten. Gas- 
trologers are of the opinion that when done in this way, 
they have a much better flavor than when boiled. Fancy 
goes far in matters of taste." 

The most singular method of cooking eggs is that at- 
tributed to the Egyptian shepherds, who, it is said, were 
able to cook eggs without fire, by placing them in a sling, 
and whirling them around so rapidly that the friction .of 
the air heated them to the exact degree desired. 

Giles Rose, chef of Charles the Second of England, 
gives a recipe for making a giant egg, which was often 
enough served upon the supper tables of the nobility and 
gentry in the seventeenth century. In the words of the 
recipe, "If you would have an eggt so bigge, there is 
an art how it may cover other egges in it, and be not 
known from a natural egge. You shall part fifty, or more, 
yelks of egges and whites, one from the other; mingle 
the yelks gently and put them into a bladder, and bind 
it round as you can ; put it into a pot full of water, and 
when you see it bubble, or when they are grown hard, 
take them out and add the white to them ; so filling the 
yelks that they stand in the middle, and boil them again 
so you shall have an egge made without a shell, which 
you shall frame thus : 

"Powder the white egge shells, clean washed, that 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 11 

they may fly into dust; steep this into strong or distilled 
vinegar, till thiey grow soft ; for if an sggt be long in vin- 
egar the shell will dissolve and grow tender that it may 
easily be passed through the small mouth of a glass ; when 
it is thrust in with fair water it will come to its former 
hardness, that you will wonder at it; when the shells 
are dissolved like an unguent, with a pencil make a shell 
about your zgge. that is boiled, and let it harden in clear 
water, so shall you have a natural egge." 

In making this giant egg a feature of the royal table, 
Giles Rose desired to show in a material way the value 
and importance of eggs in the estimation of those who 
regard the preparation of food as something more than 
a mere matter of routine drudgery. 

The world-wide popularity of the &gg has made it part 
of the folk-lore of every land; and there are few lan- 
guages in which it is not used to express a homely truth, 
or give point to some wise axiom. 

The French say : "// faut casser des oeufs pour faire 
line omelette^' (to make an omelette it is necessary to 
break eggs) ; or, in other words, one must oftentimes 
make some small sacriiice in order that an enterprise 
should be successful. ■ 

A German adage is, "Aenlich wie ein Ei dem ander- 
en" ; which means a resemblance such as one egg has 
for another. 

The Latin phrase, "Ab ovo usque ad vvala" (from the 
tgg to the apple), or "from the beginning to the end," 
has been already alluded to. 

In English we say, "As full of meat as an egg," which 
is founded on the familiar saying that an tgg contains 
as much nutriment as half a pound of meat. 

In preparing eggs for the table, the Romans cooked 
them in water, in hot ashes, on charcoal, in the frying 
pan, and also pickled them; in fact, they had twenty 
different ways of making the egg pleasing to' the eye as 
well as the taste of the bon vivamts of those days. 

Apicius, a famous epicure of ancient Rome, left many 
recipes that are still extant, and among them we iind 
those on the page following : 



12 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 

Eggs a la Remain e. — Cook several eggs; cut them 
and throw over them a seasoning composed in the fol- 
lowing manner: bruise some pepper, alisander, corian- 
der and rue, to which add garum, honey and a little oil. 

Hard Eggs a I'Athenienne. — Cut each egg in four 
parts, and sprinkle them with garum, oil and wine. 

Fried Eggs a I'Epoenete. — ^Fry several eggs, place 
them in a dish and season with a mixture of pepper, 
alisander, pine nuts, garum and benzoin. 

Egyptian Egg Pudding. — ^Take the yolks of a number 
of hard eggs, reduce them to a paste with crushed pine 
nuts, an onion, a leek, some gravy and pepper; add a 
little wine and garum ; stuff an intestine with the pulp, 
and cook. 

Dish of Eggs d, la Macedonienne. — Put into a mortar 
some pepper, mint, parsley, pennyroyal, cheese and pine 
nuts ; when these are well crushed add honey and vine- 
gar, fresh water and garum, and then a large number of 
yolks of eggs ; mix well with the rest, and throw the 
whole into a saucepan ; add bread soaked in vinegar and 
water, which must be well squeezed out, some fresh 
cows' milk cheese, cucumber, almonds, chopped onions, 
fowls' livers and garum. 

Lesbian Eggs with Roses. — Pluck the leaves of several 
roses, taking only the whitest part, and put them into a 
mortar with garum; stir a long time, add half a small 
glass of gravy; stir and strain; put into the liquor the 
brains of four fowls and eight scruples of ground pep- 
per; stir a long time, and then add to it eight eggs, half 
a small glass of wine, and as much cooked wine^ and 
lastly a little oil. Grease well the inside of a dish, pour 
the whole into it, and place it over a very slow charcoal 
fire, cook, sprinkle with pepper, and serve. 

In the "Forme of Cury" we find a recipe for poached 
eggs, with a sauce of yolks of eggs and milk seasoned 
with saffron and salt. There is also an ^gg soup (brewet 
of ayren) composed of eggs, water, butter, cheese and 
saffron, mixed together and heated, but not boiled, with 
verjuice added before serving. 

In "Two Cookery Books of the Fifteenth Century^' we 



Egg^, <^nd How to Use Them. 13 

find three recipes for eggs, two of which — potage de eggs 
and eyron enpoche — are merely poached eggs. The third 
is called eyroun en Lentyn, which probably means "eggs 
in Lent." In accordance with this recipe, the eggs are 
taken out of the shell and replaced together with milk 
of almonds, colored and seasoned with saffron and cin- 
namon, and then roasted. 

Up to the seventeenth century there was very little im- 
provement in the art of cookery, food being just as much 
overspiced as in the days of the Romans. There was a 
marked change for the better during the seventeenth and 
eighteenth centuries, but the cookery books of that period 
are evidence of the lavish manner in which spices con- 
tinued to be used, in spite of the greatly improved meth- 
ods. 

Robert May, in his "Accomplished Cook" (1665), 
gives sixty-two different styles of cooking eggs, among 
which he includes the recipe for the giant egg of Giles 
Rose. His recipes are nearly all very good, especially 
for making omelettes, of which he mentions twenty-one 
"divers wayes." Although he does not give a name to 
each of these omelettes, the reader readily recognizes 
the familiar "omelette aux fines herbes," "au fromage," 
"au lard," " a la Bonnefemme," "aux rognons et cham- 
pignons," "aux oignons," "aux asperges," etc. 

His "sixteenth way, or according^ to the Turkish mode 
of making an omelette," is curious enough to be men- 
tioned here. The omelette is garnished with the "hinder 
part of a hare, or any other venison," bacon minced 
small, pistachio nuts, hazel nuts, chestnuts, crusts of 
bread cut in slices, and sweet herbs, the dish being dec- 
orated with fried sippets of bread and slices of lemon. 

The "one and twentieth way" is an omelette with on- 
ions and apples, and a sauce of vinegar, or verjuice, but- 
ter, sugar and mustard. 

To dress eggs in the Spanish fashion, called "wivos me 
quidos," is something of a sabaillon served on toast. 

Eggs d la HuguenoUe, or "the Protestant way," is men- 
tioned in many latter day cook books, and consists of 



14 Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 

scrambled eggs with mutton, or beef gravy, mushrooms, 
orange juice and grated nutmeg. 

Among the queerly named recipes are "eggs fried as 
round as a ball," "eggs in moonshine," "eggs, or quel- 
quechose," "egg bisk," "a great dish of farced eggs," 
"egg caudle," and many others of similar quaintness 
and oddity of expression. 

As the science of cookery developed, new recipes for 
the preparation of eggs were published from time to 
time. Vincent de la Chapelle, in his "Modern Cook," 
mentions seventy-eight different ways in which eggs 
could be cooked, and it is certain that many of them 
were very extravagant in their requirements. In the 
matter of extravagant recipes, Mrs. Glasse, an English 
authority on the subject, expresses her opinion in the 
most emphatic manner. She says: "A Frenchman in 
his own country will dress a fine dinner of twenty dishes, 
and all genteel and pretty, for the expense he will put 
an English Lord to for dressing one dish. I have heard 
of a, cook that used six pounds of butter to fry twelve 
eggs, when everybody knows (that understands cooking) 
that half a pound is full enough, or more than need be 
used, but then it would not be French. So much is the 
blind folly of this age, that they would rather be im- 
posed on by a French booby than give encouragement 
to a good English cook!" 

The absurdity of the above needs no comment, yet it 
is a positive fact that the imagination of many cooks 
knows no limit. To render a dish expensive is not al- 
ways to make it taste better or more appetizing. 

Viard, in his Cuisinier Imperial, gives a recipe that 
recalls the extravagance of Lucullus. Here it is : "Roast 
twelve ducks underdone; score them down to the bone, 
press all the juice out of them, and put the juice under 
fifteen poached eggs." This dish was called "Oeufs 
poches a Vessence de canards." It reminds one of Bril- 
lat-Savarin's famous dish, "eggs in gravy," and the cir- 
cumstances under which he first prepared it. 

"One day," said this famous authority on gastronomy, 
in telling the story, "I was conducting two ladies to Me- 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 15 

lun, and on reaching Montgeron, after several hours 
travelling, v/e felt hungry enough to eat an ox. Alas! 
the inn we Stopped at, though it was decent enough look- 
ing, had nothing but an empty larder. Three stage 
coaches and two post chaises had been before us, and, 
like the Egyptian locusts, had devoured everything. 

Looking into the kitchen, however, I saw, turning on 
the spit, a leg of mutton, the very thing wanted. The 
longing glances of the ladies were in vain, for it belonged 
to three Englishmen, who had bought it, and who were 
now patiently waiting and chatting over a bottle of cham- 
pagne. 

"But surely," said I to the cook, in a mingled tone of 
entreaty and annoyance, "you might fry us some eggs 
in the gravy of this roast. With that and a cup of cof- 
fee with country cream in it, we shall be resigned to our 
fate." 

"Certainly," answered the cook, "the gravy I have a 
right to dispose of, and in two minutes you will have 
your dish." 

While he was breaking the eggs I went to the fireplace, 
and, with my traveling knife, made a dozen deep wounds 
in the forbidden "gigot," letting every drop of gravy run 
out. Then, watching the preparation of the eggs, lest 
anything should spoil my plot, I took possession of the 
dish and carried it to our room. We, of course, made 
a capital meal, laughing loudly every time we thought 
of ourselves having the best part of the roast, and our 
friends, the English, chewing the remainder." 

The recipe of the lively author of the Physiologie de 
Gout, has nothing in common with that of Viard. Bril- 
lat Savarin proved that a true gastronomist will always 
find a way to render food agreeable to the taste, while 
Viard was ambitious to shine as a cook of great merit, 
when in reality the chief feature of his recipe was its 
costliness. 

In modern cookery the eggs most commonly used are 
those of hens and ducks, and more rarely those of tur- 
keys and geese; though the eggs of certain fishes and 
reptiles are also in demand. 



16 E.ggs, and How to Use Them. 

Verdot, in his Historiographie de la Table, claims that 
ducks' eggs are best for pastry from the fact that they 
give a brighter color, better taste, and require less but- 
ter, which may be due to the fact that the oil in a duck's 
egg exceeds that of a hen's egg by so much as one- fourth. 

In Europe, more than in the United States, the eggs 
of the plover are by many looked upon as a great deli- 
cacy. They are highly esteemed by ban vivants, and 
often fetch fancy prices. They are usually served as hors 
d'oeuvre, and eaten hard boiled. 

In many countries, especially islands and along the sea 
shores, the inhabitants feed on the eggs of the different 
water birds, many of which, in spite of their fishy diet, 
are said to be of good taste. 

"For many kinds of cooking the eggs of wild birds 
are less valuable, though in the preparation of some 
sauces, where only the yellow portion of the egg is 
used, and where high color and high flavor are both es- 
teemed, two wild bird eggs are considered equal to three 
domestic ones. The flavor of an egg is determined by 
the food of the bird, all or most of it resting in the yel- 
low portion." (Simmonds.) 

The collection of the eggs of wild birds forms a 
branch of considerable industry in many countries. 

During the season, the Jutten and Dassen Islands send 
a daily average of 30,000 penguin eggs to Cape Town, 
and at the little Island of Stylt some 50,000 gulls' eggs 
are collected annually, and quite as many of other sea 
birds. 

In Africa ostrich eggs are eaten, of which one is con- 
sidered equal to twenty-four eggs of our domestic hen. 

Alexandre Dumas pere, the greaf novelist," also author 
of the Grand Dictioncdre de Cuisine, describes therein 
a recipe given him by the cook of the Bey of Arabia, for 
the preparation and making of an omelette of ostrich 
eggs. 

Emu eggs are nearly as large as those of the ostrich, 
and are frequently eaten by hunters and settlers in the 
bush of Australia. 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 17 

In the way of reptiles' eggs those of different species 
may be mentioned. 

Turtles' eggs are said to be far more nutritious than 
those of the hen. They are in the best eating condition 
when taken from the slain animal ; -and again, those 
which are only imperfectly developed are supposed to be 
the choicest; they then consist chiefly of the yolk and 
taste somewhat like terrapins' eggs. 

I know of a prominent man about town who orders 
three portions of terrapin stew for himself merely to 
partake of the eggs and liver. He is certainly a great 
lover of terrapins' eggs, and would be a good companion 
for that gourmet who ordered six woodcocks just to 
obtain the brains and intestine of the birds. 

Alligators' eggs are eaten by natives. Travelers who 
have eaten some stated to have found them very good. 

Brown, in his work on Guiana, relates a story of a 
lizard which was killed and cut for cooking, and which 
contained ten shellless eggs, midway in size between a 
pigeon and a hen's egg. They were boiled for about 
five minutes and allowed to get cold, and then eaten 
with salt. The yolk had the "consistency of butter" and 
was found to be excellent eating. 

Of fish eggs, an enormous quantity of those of the 
shad, more commonly known as shad roe, are consumed 
in this country. 

The eggs of the sterlet, a species of sturgeon found 
in Russian rivers, are used in the preparation of the finest 
caviare. 

Although there is plenty of caviare made in America 
exported to Europe and shipped back to us as the 
genuine article from Russia. 

Other kinds of eggs largely used in cookery and of 
which ninety per cent, of ordinary people have no knowl- 
edge, are the spawn of the Crustacea, as lobsters, crabs 
and shrimps. They are pounded in the mortar mixed 
with butter and used for coloring and flavoring sauces. 

The coral out of the body of the lobster is used for 
the same purpose and is also employed for decorating. 

The Chinese regard eggs which are partly hatched 



18 Eggs, and How to Use, Them. 

as the most dainty of tid-bits; and, contrary to what 
you would think, eggs in that condition are odorless. 

As to the different ways of eating eggs, the old adage, 
"De gustibus nan est disputandum," reigns suprenie. It 
is true that "fancy goes far in matters of taste." The 
simplest way, and the one most generally followed, is 
to have the eggs boiled. Here again, however, many 
conflicting ideas are encountered. Dumas asserts that 
the best way to eat a fresh egg is a la coqiM, that is to 
say, soft boiled in that fashion it loses none of its quali- 
ties. His recipe is to put the egg into cold water, which 
must be gently heated until it comes to the boiling point, 
at which instant the egg will be properly cooked. 

From experience it can be stated that this is an un- 
certain method, as it all depends upon the quantity of 
water and the degree of heat underneath the vessel con- 
taining the tgg. 

Mattieu Williams, in his Culinary Chemistry, recom- 
mends the boiling of eggs in the "bain marie," or water 
bath. "In this case," he says, "a thermometer should 
be used, and the water surrounding the egg must be 
kept at or near 180 degrees Fahr-enheit, the time of im- 
mersion being ten or twelve minutes." 

The results of this method are superior to any other, 
it is claimed, and eggs cooked in this way are "tender 
and delicate, evenly so throughout; no part being hard, 
while another part is semi-raw and slimy." 

The third method, and the one usually practiced by 
cooks, is the plunging of eggs into boiling water. Al- 
though not adopted by everybody as the true and only 
method, it is the one on which the cook can most safely 
depend to satisfy consumers. A standing law in cookery 
is that an egg, immersed as stated above, from two to 
two and a half minutes, is very soft boiled; from three 
to four minutes, it is soft; five minutes it is medium, 
that is the white is firm and the yolk is soft ; from eight 
to ten minutes' immersion makes the egg hard. 

In plunging eggs, especially fresh eggs, into boiling 
water, the shell is liable to burst. This is caused by the 
sudden exposure to the heat, which expands the albu- 



Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. ' 19 

men and causes the shell to give way. To prevent the 
breaking of the shell, only a small quantity of water 
should be used. The eggs will thus lower the tempera- 
ture of the water sufRciently to allow a little of the in- 
ner liquid of the egg to force its way through the shell, 
so that the latter will not burst. Stale eggs are not 
likely to. burst, as the shell being porous has permitted the 
evaporation of the fluid. 

There are different ways in which to judge the fresh- 
ness of eggs. The most popular method is to test their 
translucency by holding them in front of a bright light. 
If the eggs are fresh, they will be clearly transparent; 
if they are stale, or decomposed, the light will seem dull 
and cloudy. 

Another way of testing an egg is to place it in a so- 
lution of salt and water, in which there are ten ounces 
of water to one ounce of salt. If the egg is fresh, it will 
sink slowly to the bottom. The older the egg, the more 
slowly it will sink, and a bad egg will float on the sur- 
face. 

There is still another way of testing the freshness 
of an egg, and that is by touching the larger end of the 
egg with the tip of the tongue. If the egg is fresh, it will 
feel cold ; if stale, it will feel warm. This is due to the 
air bubble between the shell and the skin, which in stale 
eggs is much larger than in fresh ones, owing to the 
evaporation of the fluids. The eggshell is perforated 
with innumerable small pores, which, though too minute 
to be seen with the naked eye, are -large enough to per- 
mit air entering them, and by taking the place of the 
evaporated fluids causes the decay' of the egg. 

Many different methods are used to prevent this evap- 
oration, and thereby preserve eggs in good condition 
for a long time. The most effectual method is by cover- 
ing the egg with some greasy substance. Sometimes 
they are dipped into melted mutton and beef suet, but 
these are liable to become rancid. It would be better 
to use wax, or parafine ; even olive oil would answer bet- 
ter. An excellent way to preserve eggs is to cover them 
with a solution of gum arable and gelatine. Some deal- 



20 ^SS^, <^^ How to Use Them. 

ers, I have been told, immerse eggs in oil of vitriol di- 
luted with water, with the result that a part of the shell 
is dissolved in the acid, thus forming sulphate of lime, 
which fills up the pores. Great quantities of eggs are 
preserved by liming. These, however, are. not fit for 
iDoiling, as they generally have a disagreeable taste. 

The Scotch method of preserving eggs is to plunge 
them into boiling water, heated to 140 degrees, keep them 
there five seconds in order to coagulate the albumen next 
to the shell, and afterwards rub them with oil or suet. 

"The Chinese fashion of preserving eggs is as follows : 
They are covered with a paste of quicklime, sea salt and 
oak ashes, and thus packed away for three months in 
boxes separated by each other by rice husks. As a mat- 
ter of taste they are not nice, the white being coagulated 
and the yolks having turned green, while the smell is any- 
thing but pleasant." 

A better method of preserving eggs would be to pickle 
them. In England and the United States this is done 
often enough. When eggs are plentiful, as in Spring 
or the early part of Summer, they are boiled hard, the 
shells removed, put into earthen jars, and boiling vinegar 
seasoned with whole-pepper, allspice, bayleaves, thyme, 
onions and garlic is then poured over them; and in this 
way they will keep for quite some time, even for years. 
Thus pickled they form an agreeable accompaniment to 
cold meats. 

The dessication of eggs comes more and n;ore into 
practice. They are prepared in three forms, the first con- 
taining all the principles of the whole egg, while the 
others contain but the yolk or the white only. . 

It is claimed that dessicated eggs are just as palatable 
and just as nutritious as when in their fresh state. If 
this is really so they would be very useful to the traveler 
and soldier. At the present time dessicated eggs are 
only used by bakers and those who have more the point 
of economy than quality in view. 

When eggs are stored away, the small end should be 
uppermost, as the yolk is liable to adhere. to the shell if 
thev are laid on the side. 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 21 

The packing of eggs in bran, wood ashes, or salt, is 
likely to prove unsatisfactory, as the air will find its way 
through these substances to the eggs. 

Eggs should never be packed away in musty straw, 
as it is liable to impart an unpleasant flavor to them. 
This susceptibility of eggs to surrounding odors can be 
used to advantage when fresh truffles are in season. 
Eggs placed in contact with these tubers for forty-eight 
hours will absorb the agreeable perfume of the truffle. 
A soft-boiled egg flavored with truffle would delight the 
most exacting of gourmets. 

The mention of soft boiled eggs brings to mind the 
many, seemingly, endless arguments that have arisen as 
to their digestibility. 

According to Dr. Beaumont's Table of Digestion, the 
soft boiled egg requires three hours for digestion; the 
hard egg taking thirty minut'es longer. The reason for 
this difference in time is that the white of the egg, being 
almost pure albumen, is more readily acted upon by the 
gastric juices when it is soft. For this same reason a raw 
egg needs only two hours for digestion. 
, Persons of sedentary habits, or those whose stomachs 
are easily affected, should only eat eggs that are soft 
boiled, or poached ; while those fortunate individuals who 
have plenty of exercise, can eat any kind of cooked eggs 
without fear of injuring their digestive powers. 

Raw eggs mixed with sugar and sherry, or brandy, 
are an excellent stimulant and restorative, and, at the 
same time, they are slightly laxative. Hard eggs, on 
the contrary, are said to cause constipation. On this 
point. Dr. Muffett must be quoted once more, where he 
tells in quaint language, that "Brassavola reporteth a 
monk to have been made costiff with hard eggs that no 
art was available to give him on stool." 

Johnston, in his Chemistry of Common Life, says : 
"The egg, as a whole, is richer in fat than fat beef. It 
is equalled in this respect, among common kind of food, 
only by pork and by eels. It is of interest to remark, 
however, that the white of the egg is entirely free from 
fat, and that albumen is a very constipating variety of 



22 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 

animal food, so that it requires much fat to be eaten with 
it, when consumed in any quantity, in order that this 
quahty may be counteracted. It is no doubt because 
experience has long ago proved this in the stomach of 
the people, that 'eggs and bacon' have been the popular 
dish among Gentile nations from time immemorial." 

Eggs are certainly very nutritious, as they contain 
fourteen parts, in a hundred, of albumen. They are 
therefore, weight for weight, almost as valuable for 
strengthening and tissue making as muscular flesh. Eggs 
are also regarded by many as an excellent brain food, 
owing to the large percentage of phosphorus which they 
contain. A story is told of a German scholar who took 
refuge in a barn from the infuriated soldiery. During 
two weeks this man -lived on one egg a day, innocently 
furnished by a hen, whose nest was within his reach. 
This shows not only that a man can subsist on a small 
amount of nourishment, but also that eggs are among 
the most perfect foods possessed by mankind. 

It is true, however, that eggs are not beneficial to every 
one. Some persons of a very delicate digestion may find 
eggs a satisfactory and pleasant article of diet, while 
others far more robust may find them extremely hurtful. 

A few figures as to the number of eggs consumed each 
year in the United States will show the widespread popu- 
larity of the egg as an article of food. 

Dr. E. Atkinson, in The Science of Nutrition, says, "In 
our factory boarding houses in Massachusetts the con- 
sumption of eggs per adult is one every other day. One 
Qgg every other day, at sixteen and a half cents a dozen, 
comes to three dollars a year per adult. We may com- 
pute our present population as being equal to fifty million 
adults; fifty million adults, at three dollars each, would 
spend one hundred and fifty million dollars a year for 

eggs." 

Simmonds, in his book, Animal Food Resources of the 
World, says "the egg traffic of the United States is ex- 
ceedingly large." 

"The aggregate transactions in the City of New York 
are said to amount $8,000,000 in value." 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 23 

The same authority says that "over 20,000 carloads of 
live and dressed poultry are carried into New York City 
yearly, and 25,500,000 dozen of eggs go to the same 
market." "According to the best authorities the United 
States produce nine thousand million of eggs annually." 

Figures are facts, and the above, which is far from 
being exaggerated, tends to prove that eggs play a greater 
part in the preservation of mankind than many persons 
are willing to admit. 



FRIAR O'MEARA'S SONG. 

BY FATHER PROUT (rEV. FRANCIS MAHONy). 

Why then, sure it was made by a learned owl. 

The "rule" by which I beg. 
Forbidding to eat of the tender fowl 
That hangs on yonder peg. 
But, rot it ! no matter : 
For here on a platter. 
Sweet Margaret brings 
A food fit for kings ; 
And a meat 
Clean and neat — 
That's an egg! 
Sweet maid. 
She brings me an egg newly laid! 
And to fast I need ne'er be afraid ! 
For 'tis Peg' 
That can find me an egg. 

Three different ways there are of eating them; 

First boiled, then fried with salt, — 
But there's a particular way of treating them. 



24 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 

Where many a cook's at fault : 
For with parsley and flour 
'Tis in Margaret's power 
To make up a dish, 
Neither meat, fowl, nor fish; 
But in Paris they call't 
A neat 
Omelette. 
Sweet girl ! 
In truth, as in Latin, her name is a pearl, 

When she gets 
Me a platter of nice omelettes. 

Och ! 'tis all in my eye, and a joke. 
To casting a sorrowful yoke; 

Sure, of Dublin-bay herrings a keg, 

And an egg. 
Is enough for all sensible folk ! 
Success to the fragrant turf-smoke. 
That curls round the pan on the fire ; 
While the sweet yellow yolk 
From the, egg-shell is broke 
In that pan, 
Who can, 
If he have but the heart of a man. 
Not feel the soft flame of desire. 
When it burns to a clinker the heart of a friar? 



PART II. 



ALTHOUGH most cook books contain a large num- 
ber of recipes for the preparation of eggs in a 
variety of styles, yet there are really not more than a 
■dozen distinctly different methods of cooking eggs ; and 
they may be classified as follows : boiled, poached, mollet ; 
shirred, or mi miroir; scrambled, , fried ; in cocottes, or 
<;ases ; moulded in timbales; hard, stuffed, cold, omelettes, 
sweet; and a few miscellaneous styles which can not be 
very well specially classified. 

In writing this little book, it has not been my inten- 
tion to produce a long and learned treatise upon the art 
of cookery, but simply to give, in the fewest possible 
words, directions for the proper preparation of eggs in 
any of the above mentioned styles. By this means a per- 
son, who orders eggs prepared in a certain way, can have 
some idea of the manner in which they are made ready 
for his use; and at the same time these directions may 
be of service to the professional cook by explaining briefly 
the details of preparation in each of the widely varying 
styles of egg cookery. 

As no other article of food offers so much scope for 
the inventive genius of a thoughtful cook as the egg, 
it may be that there is still greater diversity of styles of 
preparing it for the table than those I have mentioned. 
If so, I ask the kind indulgence of such of my readers 
as may, perchance, know of some excellent way of cook- 
ing eggs that has not come to my knowledge. 

"To err is human," said the old Latin poet, who also 
hastened to add, "but to forgive is divine." 



26 Egg-s, and Hozv to Use Them. 



Boiled Eggs. 



IN the first part of this book allusion was made to the 
various ways in which eggs can be boiled, and it is 
surprising that, in what is seemingly so simple a matter, 
so many questions can arise for serious consideration 
before a final decision is reached as to which of several 
methods should be adopted. Under circumstances where 
the saving of time is no consideration, and where the 
man who orders his eggs boiled expects to get them, 
as they ought to be, "tender and delicate," the following 
method should be employed : 

For six eggs have one quart of boiling. water; plunge 
in the eggs and leave them for five to eight minutes 
without boiling. The eggs will lower the temperature 
of the water, and bring it to about 180°, that is 30° less 
than the boiling point. The white will then be of a 
creamy consistency, and more apt to blend with the yolk, 
and also be easier of digestion. 

Another method, commonly adopted in hotel and 
restaurant kitchens, is to plunge the eggs into boiling 
water; and after an immersion of two to two and a half 
minutes the eggs are regarded as very soft; after three 
to four minutes, soft; after five to six minutes, medium; 
and after eight to ten minutes, hard. 

I do not consider this method as the best, though hotel 
and restaurant cooks rely upon it as the safest, in spite 
of the fact that oftentimes the result has been disappoint- 
ing, even when, watch in hand, exactitude in time has 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 27 

been observed. Few are aware of the fact that the cause 
of such disappointment is due largely to the freshness of 
the eggs. Mention has been previously made of the fact 
that the fluids of the egg will evaporate day by day, leav- 
ing greater density to the white of the egg, which there- 
fore will coagulate more quickly than the white of a fresh 
laid egg, which is very watery in substance. 

Another important factor to be considered in boiling 
eggs is their temperature. Eggs taken from an ice box 
will cool the water much more than those that have been 
in the usual kitchen temperature several hours, and the 
former therefore require longer time to cook than the 
latter. Every cook should adopt a certain system, 
founded upon his personal experience in boiling eggs, 
so as to suit the different tastes which he endeavors to 
satisfy. 

Still another system of boiling eggs is to put them 
into a sufficient quantity of cold water and cover them. 
When the water begins to boil, the eggs are ready to be 
served. This, in the writer's opinion, is the second best 
method. 

Eggs can also be steamed, and that method has been 
adopted in a number of hotels. 

Some few years ago a mechanical device for correctly 
timing the boiling of eggs was introduced into many 
restaurant and hotel kitchens, and was warmly welcomed 
by many cooks, as it relieved them of all blame if the 
eggs were not satisfactorily cooked. It consisted of a 
wire basket with an automatic attachment, by means of 
which the basket came out of the water when the eggs 
had been in the boiling water the number of minutes 
desired by the person ordering them. 



28 Egg^j <^wd How to Use Them. 



Poached Eggs. 

POACHED eggs are nothing more nor less than eggs 
boiled' without the shell. 

The most important requisite is that the eggs should 
be fresh, as stale eggs will never poach well, even if the 
greatest care is used in handling them. 

There are two distinct methods of poaching eggs, and 
that the reader may judge for himself which is the more 
preferable, the recipes for both are appended. The first 
method, in accordance with the directions given by most 
of the French authors on the art of cookery, is as fol- 
lows : 

Have three quarts of boiling water in a shallow pan, 
and for each quart add a tablespoonful of vinegar and a 
teaspoonful of salt. Break three or four eggs into the 
water, just where it is boiling, and with a skimmer gently 
turn the egg so that it may take an elongated shape. As 
Soon as the eggs are firm take them out with the skimmer, 
and put them into cold water; before serving put them, 
for a few minutes, into hot water again. 

The second method, usually followed in America and 
England, is the following: 

Have three quarts of boiling water in a shallow pan; 
salt it slightly, and drop into it three or four eggs ; do 
not allow the water to boil any. longer, and leave the eggs 
in it about three minutes, until the white is firm; then 
take them "out, trim them, and serve on toast, or as 
directed. 

There is very little difference between the above two 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 29 

recipes save the omission of vinegar in the second one. 
Many French cooks claim that vinegar possesses the 
property of giving a good shape to the tgg while it is 
being poached. I claim, however, and I do so from ex- 
perience, that vinegar (or verjuice, which was used in 
bygone days) has no other effect than to make the white 
of the egg tough; and, therefore, I prefer the second 
method, as it does not allow the water to boil after the 
eggs are put into it. In this I follow the theory of 
Mattieu Williams, and the result is more satisfactory to 
the cook and more beneficial to the eater. 

Poached eggs are often ordered by physicians for con- 
valescent patients. In such cases the eggs should always 
be served perfectly plain, without sauces or condiments. 
They are usually served on toast, or on crusts of bread 
shaped like the egg. These crusts are scooped out, fried 
in butter, and filled with divers garnishings. Crusts of 
puff-paste can be substituted advantageously for those 
of bread; they are then shaped. into round or oval tartlet 
moulds, according to the taste of the cook. 



30 Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 

Poached Eggs — Oeufs Poches 

a la Agostini — Agostini. 

Eggs served on a bed of plain boiled rice surrounded 
with tomato sauce prepared as follows : chop one 
large onion very fine, and smother in olive oil until 
throughly cooked, then add six tomatoes which were 
previously peeled, the seeds pressed out and cut in 
small pieces ; when the tomatoes are reduced to a 
pulp add a little rich gravy and a tablespoonful of 
beef extract; season lightly with red pepper. 

a I'Aigre-doux — imth Sour-Sweet Sauce. 

Eggs served on toast; Madeira sauce mixed with 
currant jelly potired over them. 

a I' Alsacienne — Alsatian Style. 

Eggs served on slices of fat goose liver; Madeira 
sauce over them. 

(2) Tartlet crusts filled with puree of sorrel ; a round 
slice of lean ham placed on top of the sorrel and 
the eggs dished up on top of the ham, with rich 
gravy poured over all. 

a I' Americaine — American Style. 

Cut tomatoes in halves; squeeze out the seeds; sea- 
son with salt and pepper ; besprinkle with butter and 
bake in the oven, then fill with a lobster hash cooked 
with cream; put the eggs on top, and cover with 
cream sauce. 

a I'Amiral — Admiral's Fashion. 

Fill some crusts, made of pufifpaste, with a chicken 
hash and truffles in cream ; put the poached eggs on 
top and cover with cream sauce. 



£gg^j <^nd Hoiv to Use Them. 31 

Poached Eggs — Oeufs Poches 

a I'Arlequin — Harlequin's Fashion. 

Eggs served on toast; cream sauce poured over; 
besprinkle with chopped beeftongue, truffles and 
parsley. 

a I'Aurore — Aurora. 

Eggs covered with half tomato and half cream sauce 

mixed ; besprinkle with chopped hard boiled yolk of 

egg- 
a la Baron Brisse — Baron Brisse Style. 

Eggs dished up on round flat chicken croquettes; 

cream sauce poured over and streWn with finely 

chopped truffles. 

a la Bayonnaise. 

Cut round slices of bread and some of pumpkin of 
the same size, just a little larger than the poached 
Ggg; fry them both in butter, put the pumpkin on 
the bread and the egg on the pumpkin ; pour over a 
cream sauce mixed with puree of onions. 

a la Bayard — Bayard. 

Eggs served on pate de foie gras toast, covered with 
a garnishing of shredded ham, truffles, and mush- 
rooms heated in Madeira sauce. 

a la Bearnaise — with Bearnaise Sauce. 

Eggs served on toast and covered with Bearnaise 

sauce. 
a la Belle-Helene — Belle Helena Style. 

(1) Eggs served on flat, round chicken croquettes, 
cream sauce poured over and garnished with 
asparagus tips tossed in butter. 

(2) Another method is to dish up the eggs on 
croquettes made with asparagus tips ; cream sauce 
poured over. 

a la Belloy — Belloy Style. 

Eggs on a thick sHce of smoked beeftongue heated 
in Madeira; pour over cream sauce blended with 
puree of spinach. 



32 Eggs, and Hoiv to Use Them. 

Poached Kggs — Oeufs Poches 

a la Benedict — Benedict. 

Split and toast some small muffins; put on each a 
nice round slice of broiled ham, and on the ham the 
poached egg; pour over some Hollandaise sauce. 

a la Bignon — Bignon. 

Have some light chicken cream forcemeat, with 
which dress (with the aid of a pastry bag) some 
rings on the dish on which the eggs are to be served ; 
cover them with a white buttered paper, and cook for 
four or five minutes in a slack oven. In the centre 
of each ring put the eggs and pour over a veloute 
sauce reduced with some good chicken stock and 
cream and besprinkle with chopped tarragon leaves. 

a la Blanchard — Blcmchard Style. 

Have muffins split and toasted; put a slice of 
broiled ham on each half, poached eggs on top 
and truffle sauce over all. 

a la Bombay — Bombay Style. 

Eggs dished up on a bed of plain boiled rice. 
Cream curry sauce, to which has been added some 
finely minced green and red peppers, poured on 
the dish around the rice. 

d la Bohemienne — Bohemian Style. 

Eggs served on halves of tomatoes stuffed with 
gooseliver and chopped mushrooms; pour over a 
cream sauce mixed with puree of tomatoes. 

a la Boieldieu — Boieldieu. 

Fill some bread crusts with fresh tomatoes which 
were previously peeled, squeezed and cut in eighths 
(or if the tomatoes are large still smaller) and cooked 
in oil until perfectly dry; put on each crust an egg; 
and cover with veloute cream sauce. 

a la Bonnefoy — Bonnefoy. 

Make a puree of half game and half pate de foie 
gras to which add some chopped truffles; heat the 
puree and put in some china cases ; serve the poached 
eggs on top and cover with veloute sauce reduced 
with game stock. 



Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 33 

Poached Eggs — Oeufs Poches 

d la Bonvalet — Bonvalet. 

Cut some round slices of bread, fry them in clarified 
. butter and place on each a poached egg; cover the 
eggs with a well-reduced veloute sauce; on the 
outer rim of the crust put some Bearnaise sauce 
mixed with tomato puree. 

a la Bostonienne — Boston Style. 

Eggs served on small round fish cakes surrounded 
with cream sauce. 

au Bouillon — in Broth. 

"Eggs served in broth or consomme. 

a la Bourguignone — Burgundy Style. 

Eggs poached in Burgundy wine and served on fried 
slices of bread ; with the remaining wine and a little 
beef extract the sauce is prepared by thickening it 
with a little butter kneaded with flour. 

a la Brebant — Brebant. 

Crusts of pufif-paste filled with a puree of quails 
and pate de foie gras ; poached eggs on top and cov- 
ered with Madeira sauce. 

d la Bretonne — Britanny Style. 

Eggs served on oval shaped slices of smoked beef- 
tongue heated in Madeira, covered with brown sauce 
mixed with a puree of onions. Instead of brown 
sauce one made of cream may be served. 

d la Cafe Anglcds — Cafi Anglais. 

With a chicken and lobster forcemeat dress rings 
on a dish the same as for eggs d la Bignon; cook 
them for a few minutes, put in the eggs and cover 
with crayfish sauce. 

d la Cardinal — Cardinal's Fashion. 

Eggs served on toast and covered with lobster sauce 
besprinkled with chopped lobster coral. 



34 Eggs, and How to Use Than. 

Poached Eggs — Oeufs Poches 

a la Celestine — Celestine. 

Rd^uffins split and toasted are covered with a slice 
of broiled ham upon which poached eggs are laid; 
pour over some cream sauce mixed with cheese, 
and gratinate under a salamander or in a very hot 
oven. 

aux Champignons — with Mushrooms. 

Mushrooms sliced and heated in Madeira sauce 
poured over the eggs. 

a la Chantilly — Chantilly. 

Crusts of bread filled with shredded truffles in cream ; 
eggs on top ; cream sauce with a little beef extract 
poured over. 

a la Colbert — Colbert Style. 

Eggs on fried slices of bread covered with Colbert 
sauce ; or serve in rings of chicken forcemeat with 
the abo.ve sauce. 

a la Comtesse— Countess Style. 

Puff-paste crusts filled with asparagus tips ; eggs on 
top covered with cream sauce. 

a la Conde — Condi Style. 

Eggs on puree of foie gras toast; Veloute cream 
'sauce poured over; garnished with chicken cro- 
quettes in ithe shape of small balls (2 to each 

a la Coquelin — Coquelin Style. 

Eggs served on broiled ham and garnished with 
quartered artichoke bottoms tossed in butter; 
Hollandaise sauce poured over the eggs and on 
top a slice of truffle. 

d la Creme — with Cream. 

Eggs served on toast and covered with cream sauce. 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 35 

Poached Eggs — Oeufs Poches 

a la Creme d'Asperges — with Cream of Asparagus. 

Crusts of bread, or of puff-paste, filled with a puree 
of asparagus mixed with cream sauce; eggs served 
on top. 

a la Crhne de Celeri — ivith Cream, of Celery. 

Served the same way as the aforegoing ; use a puree 
of celery instead of asparagus. 

sur Croute — on Crusts. 

Crusts for poached eggs can be either made of plain 
bread or puff-paste. 

Bread Crusts. — Cut slices of sandwich bread about 
three-eighths of an inch to one inch in thickness; 
give them an oval shape, or they may be cut round ; 
with a small pointed knife make an incision on the 
top all around the border ; then fry in clarified butter ; 
after the crusts are cooled of? slightly, take off the 
cover and scoop out all the soft part of the bread; 
this hollow part is generally filled with the diverse 
purees, garnishings, etc. 

Puff-paste Crusts. — Roll out some puff-paste trim- 
mings to a thickness of about one-eighth of an inch ; 
line with some tartelet moulds and fill them up with 
split peas or dried white beans ; bake in a quick oven 
from twelve to fifteen minutes ; take out the peas 
and beans and the. crusts are ready for using. 

d, la Cussy — Cussy. 

Bread crusts filled with a ragotit of breast of quail, 
fat goose liver and truffles, all cut in squares and 
mixed with brown sauce; eggs on top and covered 
with veloute cream sauce. 

d la Danton — Danton Style. 

Eggs on toasit, Venetian sauce poured over, gar- 
nished with calf's brain fritters a la Villeroi. 

a la Daumont — Daumont. 

Eggs served in chicken forcemeat borders, as eggs 
a la Bignon, and covered with onion cream sauce. 



36 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 

Poached Eggs — Oeiifs Poches 

a la Dauphine — Dauphine. 

Bread crusts filled with asparagus tips ; eggs on top 
and Madeira sauce with sliced mushrooms poured 
over. 

a la Diable — Deviled. 

Eggs on fried slices of bread; deviled sauce poured 
over them. 

d la Ducliesse — Duchesse Style. 

Eggs served on small flat Duchess potato cakes 
covered with Colbert sauce. 

d la Dumas^-Dumas. 

Eggs covered with horseradish cream sauce, be- 
sprinkled with grated Parmesan cheese and a little 
melted butter; gratinated under the salamander or 
in a hot oven. 

a I'Eca/rlate — Ecarlate. 

Eggs on slices of smoked or pickled beef-tongue 
and cream sauce. 

aux Ecrevisses — with Crayftsh. 

Eggs on toast covered with crayfish sauce, mixed 
with crayfish tails. 

aux Epinards — with Spinach. 

Eggs on a bed of finely chopped and well-seasoned 
spinach, surrounded with a rich gravy. 

a I'Espagnole — Spanish Style. 

Eggs on a layer of risotto seasoned with onions, 
saffron and tomatoes, surrounded with tomato sauce. 

a I'Bstragon — with Tarragon. 

Rich veal gravy with chopped tarragon leaves 
poured over the eggs. 



^Si^i o^d Hoiv to Use Them. 2)7 

Poached Eggs — Oeufs Poches 

a la Fedora — Fedora Style. 

Egg served on artichoke bottoms filled with puree 
of foie gras; Bordeaux sauce with small cubes of 
parboiled marrow poured over. 

d, la Florentine — Florence Style. 

Eggs served on artichoke bottoms; cream sauce 
with chicken and mushrooms cut in small squares 
poured over. 

& la Georgette — Georgette. 

Large baked potatoes cut in halves and scooped out ; 
put one poached egg in each half and cover with a 
cream sauce mixed with Parmesan cheese and melted 
butter, then gratinate under the salamander or in a 
very hot oven. 

a la Gerifiaine — Germaine. 

Eggs on large-sized fresh mushrooms covered with 
a sauce colbert, to which chopped tarragon leaves 
are added. 

des Gourmets — Gourmet's Fashion. 

Eggs on pate de foie gras toast, covered with Bear- 
naise sauce., 

d la Gounod — Gounod. 

Eggs on mushrooms, cooked in oil, and covered 
with a well-reduced and buttered tomato sauce. 

a la Heloise — Heloise. 

Puff-paste crusts filled with a ragoiit of square cut 
truffles, chicken and smoked beeftongue in cream; 
eggs on top with thick tomato sauce. 

d, la Hussard — Hussard. 

Halves of tomatoes stuffed with chopped ham and 
mushrooms; eggs on top covered with cream sauce. 



38 Eggs, and Hoiv to Use Them. 

Poached Eggs — Oeufs Podies 

d I'Imperiale — Imperial Fashion. 

Eggs on foie gras toast; veloute cream sauce over 
the eggs and besprinkled with shredded truffles. 

d I'Indienne — Indian Style. 

Eggs on a bed of plain boiled rice; cream curry 
sauce surrounding it. 

au Jambon — with Ham. 

Eggs on broiled or fried slices of ham. 

d la lean Bard — Jean Bard Style. 

Eggs served on itoast with a slice of ham. Mix 
minced shallots and mushrooms (cooked in but- 
ter) with Supreme sauce; finish with lemon juice 
and chopped parsley and pour over eggs. 

a la Jeanette — leanette Style. 

Eggs served on small crusts filled with artichoke 
bottoms and truffles (cut in small squares and 
added to brown sauce) ; Veloute cream sauce 
poured over and on each egg a small round slice 
of smoked beeftongue (heated). 

au Jus — mth Gravy. 

The best gravy to use with eggs is veal gravy ; how- 
ever, it can be substituted by some other kind, and 
if none at hand some light brown sauce, to which 
a little beef extract is added, may be used. 

a la Karolyi — Karolyi. 

Eggs on broiled slices of ham, covered with tomato 
sauce, seasoned with paprika pepper. 

au Lard- — with Bacon. 

Eggs served on toast, garnished with broiled or 
fried strips of bacon. 

d la Lyonnaise — Lyonese Style. 

Eggs on artichoke bottoms ; brown sauce with onion 
puree poured over. 



Eggs, and Horv to Use Them. 39 

Poached Eggs. — Oeufs Poches 

a la Magenta — Magenta. 

Eggs on crusts filled with crayfish tails in cream; 
cream sauce, finished with crayfish butter, poured 
over the eggs, garnished with asparagus tips. 

a la Marec.hale — Marshal Style. 

Round slices of ham (coated on one side with 
cream-chicken forcemeat and cooked in a slack 
oven) placed on a dish; on each slice one egg; 
cover with Supreme sauce mixed with chopped 
truffles. 

en Matelote — Mariners' Fashion. 

Eggs on fried slices of bread ; claret sauce garnished 
with small glazed onions and mushrooms poured 
over them. 

a la Maximilien — Maximilian Style. 

English muffins split and toasted and spread with 
a thick layer of puree of chicken; eggs placed on 
top and covered with cream sauce mixed with a 
puree of red peppers. / 

a la Mazarin — Masarin. 

Halves of tomatoes stuffed with liver forcemeat 
mixed with chopped truffles, mushrooms, beeftongue 
and breast of partridge or chicken ; eggs on top and 
brown tarragon sauce poured over. 

a la Melba — Melba Style. 

Eggs on toast garnished with oyster crabs a la 
Newburg and small anchovy fritters. 

a la Mignon — Mignon Style. 

Pastry crusts filled with asparagus tips tossed in 
butter; eggs served on top and Hollandaise sauce 
poured over. 



40 £gS^' ^'^^ Hozv to Use Them. 

Poached Eggs — Oeufs Poches 

d la Mirabeau — Mirabeau Style. 

Eggs on toasit with fine strips of anchovy fillets 
laid over them in star shape ; garnish with stoned 
and sliced Spanish olives and Julienne potatoes; 
Madeira sauce. ■ 

a la Monthoicm — Montholon Style. 

Eggs dished up on anchovy toast; cream sauce 
with shredded mushrooms and chicken poured 
over. 

a la Mornay — Mornay. 

Eggs covered with cream sauce mixed with cheese, 
and then gratinated. 

d la Moutarde — with Mustard Sauce. 

Eggs served on toast and covered with mustard 
sauce. The best mustard sauce for eggs would be 
to mix either some English or French mustard with 
Hollandaise sauce. 

d la Moscovite — Moscow Style. 

Eggs on fried slices of bread; cream sauce poured 
over and besprinkled with chopped parsley, truffles 
and lobster coral; garnish with small pufif -paste 
crescents filled with caviare. 

d la Nationale — National. 

Cream sauce mixed with tomato puree and grated 
cheese, poured over the eggs and then gratinated. 

a la Nelson — Nelson Style. 

Eggs served on fish cakes ; Hollandaise mixed with 
puree of onions poured over. 

a la Neptune — Neptune. 

Eggs on fried slices of bread, garnished with lobster 
cut in small squares and stewed in cream. 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 41 

Poached Eggs — Oeufs Poches 

a la Nesselrode — Nesselrade Style. 

Crusts filled with puree of chestnuts, egg on top, 
Colbert sauce poured over. 

d la Normande — Normandy Style._ 

Bread crusts filled with onion puree mixed with 
chopped ham ; eggs on top and tomato sauce poured 
over. 

d la d'Orleans — d'OrUams. 

Puree made with cooked pheasant and fat goose 
liver heated with some thick veloute sauce. Bor- 
ders of the above are dressed on the dish, and a 
poached egg is laid in each; a veloute cream sauce 
reduced with game stock poured over. 

d I'Oseille — with Sorrel. 

Eggs dished up over a puree of sorrel. 

d la Parisis — Parisis Style. 

Eggs served on pastry crusts; eggs covered with 
thick Hollandaise sauce and tomato sauce poured 
on the dish around. 

aux Pointes d'Asperges — with Asparagus Tips. 

Eggs garnished with asparagus tips, previously 
cooked in water and then tossed in butter. 

d la Portugaise — Portuguese Fashion. 

Halves oi tomatoes fried in oil, put on fried slices 
of bread ; eggs on top and tomato sauce poured over. 

d la Prince Egon — Prince Egon Fashion. 

Cream sauce with truffles and crayfish cut in small 
dice poured over the eggs. 

d la Provengde — Provencial Fashion. 

Eggs on fried slices of bread ; a thick tomato sauce 
(with a suspicion of garlic) poured over. 



42 Egg^j (^'^d Hozv to Use Them. 

Poached Eggs — Oeufs Poch.es 

a la puree d'ArtichoMts — imth puree of Artichokes. 

a la puree d'Asperges — ivith puree of Asparagus. 

a la puree de Champignons — ivith puree of Mushrooms. 

a la puree de Gibier — with puree of Game. 

a la puree de Lentilles-^-^itnth puree of Lentils. 

a la puree de Marrons — zinth puree of Cliestnuts. 

a la puree de Pais — with puree of Peas. 

a la puree d'Oignons — vuith puree of- Onions. 

a la puree d'Oseille — zvith puree of Sorrel. 

a la puree de Tomates — zmth puree of Tomatoes. 

a la puree de Volaille — with puree of Chicken. 

Besides the above named purees eggs can be served 
with quite a number of others. The purees used for 
garnishing can either be served in bread or puff- 
paste crusts and the eggs served on top of these ; or, 
the puree can be put on the dish and the eggs laid 
upon it; however, the former way , is more elegant 
and generally adopted in first-class houses. 

a la Renan — Renan. 

Garnish some china cases with minced chicken in 
cream; put a poached egg in each and pour over a 
veloute cream sauce finished with a puree of chicory 
or spinach. 

(2) Eggs served on pate de foie gras toast; cream 
sauce mixed with puree of spinach poured over. 

a la Rossini — Rossini. 

Eggs on slices of fat gooseliver ; truffle sauce poured 
over. 

a la Rothschild — Rothschild. 

Puff-paste crusts filled with a puree of truffles and 
pate de foie gras; eggs on top with Madeira sauce. 

d la Rou,gemont — Rougemont Style. 

Eggs on a bed of a Risotto a la Milanaise, covered 
partly with cream sauce and partly with tomato 
sauce so as to give it a marbled appearance. 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 43 

Poached Eggs — Oeufs Poches 

a la Russe — Russian Fashion. 

Egs on caviare toast, garnished with strips of bone- 
less anchovies, and surrounded with Madeira sauce. 

a la SagoM — Sagan. 

Eggs on fried slices of bread ; a cream veloute sauce 
with curry, garnished with shredded chicken and 
cepes poured over. 
Boiled rice may be served separate. 

a la Sevigne — Sevigne. 

Puff -paste crusts filled with chicken hash and truffles 
in cream; eggs on top covered with cream sauce. 

a la Siciliewne — Sicilian Fashion. 

Eggs on bread crusts filled with puree of chicken 
livers ; tomato sauce poured over. 

a la Soubise — Souhise. 

Eggs on toast; cream sauce mixed with puree of 
onions poured over. 

a la Stuers—Stuers. 

Eggs on pate de foie gras toast; cream sauce with 
essence of truffles poured over; a glazed slice of 
truffle on each egg. 

aux Truffes — with TruMes. 

Eggs on toast, covered either with Madeira or cream 
sauce with sliced truffles. 

a la Turque — Turkish Style. 

Eggs on fried slices of tgg plant and tomato sauce. 

a la d'U xelles-^d'U xelles. 

Eggs on fried slices of .bread, covered with a sauce 
made of chopped shallots, mushrooms and fine herbs 
cooked in butter, reduced with white wine, finished 
with half brown, and half tomato sauce mixed. 



44 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 

Poached Eggs — Oeufs Poches 

a la Valois — Valois. 

Eggs on crusts filled with lobster and truffles cooked 
in cream. Tomato sauce poured over. 

a la Vefour — Vefour. 

Eggs on tartelet crusts filled with crayfish tails 
stewed in cream ; cream sauce finished with anchovy 
and lobster butter poured over the eggs. 

a la Veron — Veron. 

Artichoke bottoms filled with chopped beeftongue 
and truffles; eggs on top and covered with cream 
sauce and cheese ; then gratinated. 

a la Victoria — Victoria. 

Bread crusts filled with crab meat cooked in cream ; 
eggs on top covered with cream curry sauce finished 
with lobster butter. 

a la Volney — Volney Style. 

Small crusts filled with foie gras and truffles (cut 
in squares and mixed with Madeira sauce) ; eggs 
on top and Veloute cream sauce poured over. 

d la Waldorf — Waldorf Style. 

Egg on foie gras toast, fresh mushroom on top of 
the egg and Perigueux sauce poured over. 

d la Walter Scott — Walter Scott. 

Eggs on toast, garnished with lobster cut in squares 
and cooked in cream; tomato sauce finished with 
lobster butter poured over the eggs. 

d la Zaza — Zaza Style. 

Egg served on anchovy toast; pour over pepper 
and tomato sauce blended — previously adding 
equal parts of finely shredded gherkins, sweet red 
peppers, mushrooms, ham and breast of chicken. 

a la Zingara — Zingara Style. 

Served on fried crusts of bread and covered with 
thick tomato sauce mixed with finely shredded 
ham. 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 4S 



Eggs Mollet. 



EGGS MOLLET should properly be classified among 
soft-boiled eggs, as is clearly indicated by the mean- 
ing of the word "mollet." 

In preparing eggs mollet, it is absolutely necessary that 
the eggs be very fresh. Plunge them into boiling water, 
cover the vessel they are in, and bring it to the corner of 
the range, not permitting the water to boil, and, after an 
immersion of ten minutes, take them out, and put them 
into cold water to cool ofif. Then take ofiE the shell very 
cautiously, as the eggs being quite soft are liable to break. 
When they are fresh from the shell, put them back into 
clean cold water, and when ready to use heat them in 
water or broth for a few minutes. 

Eggs mollet can also be prepared by cooking the eggs 
for five minutes in boiling water, and then proceeding as 
Stated above. 

Eggs mollet are usually served on toast, crusts, etc. 



46 EggSj and Hozv to Use Them. 

Eggs. MoUet (soft) — Oeufs MoUet 

a la Bechamel — Bechamel. 

Eggs on toast ; cream sauce poured over. 
a la Berlioz — Berlioz. 

Mushrooms and breast of partridge cut in small 

squares and stewed in cream; eggs served on top. 

poured over. 

a la Bordelaise — Bordeaux Style. 

Eggs on fried slices of bread ; Bordeaux sauce poured 
over. 

a la Bourguignone — Burgundy Style. 

Puff-paste crusts filled with scrambled eggs with 
asparagus tips and truffles; an egg mollet on each 
crust. 

a la Bruxelloise — Bnusel Fashion. 

Eggs on fried slices of bread, garnished with Brus- 
sel sprouts ; cream sauce poured over the eggs. 

d la Catalane — Catalane. 

Eggs on bread crusts filled with crab meat, stewed 
in cream, covered with tomato sauce. 

d, la Chantilly — Chamtilly. 

Eggs on small puff-paste crusts filled with puree of 
onions ; thick tomato sauce over the eggs. 

d la Chicoree — with Chicory. 

Chicory chopped fine, mixed with cream, and well 
seasoned; eggs on top. Serve good rich gravy 
around the chicory. 

a la Chasseur — Hunter's Fashion. 

Eggs on a puree of chestnuts mixed with puree of 
game; Madeira sauce reduced with game stock. 

a la Constance — Constance Style. 

Set the eggs on small crusts filled with asparagus 
tips tossed in butter. Pour over Bechamel sauce, 
besprinkled with grated Parmesan cheese, and grat- 
inate quickly. 



EggSj and Hozv to Use Them. 47 

Eggs MoUet (soft) — Oeufs MoUet 

en D emi-deuil — Demi-deuil. 

Eggs covered with cream sauce, besprinkled with 
chopped truffles. 

aux Eprevisses — with Crayfish. 

Eggs over crayfish tails stewed in cream. 

aiLv Epinards — zinth Spinach. 

Eggs on a bed of spinach chopped fine, mixed with 
cream and well seasoned, surrounded with rich 
gravy. 

a la Frangaise — French Style. 

Eggs on puff-paste crusts filled with a ragout of 
cock's combs and cock's kidneys in veloute cream 
sauce. 

a la Garlin — Garlin. 

Eggs on artichoke bottoms ; cream sauce with 
shredded chicken and truffles poured over. 

a la du Guesclin — du Guesclin. 

Eggs on bread crusts filled with curried lobster; 
cream sauce with paprika poured over the eggs ; 
chopped truffles, lobster coral and parsley sprinkled 
over. 

a la Heloise — Heloise. 

Eggs on fried slices of ham ; Hollandaise sauce with 
shredded beef tongue and truffles poured over the 
eggs, and around them serve a well-reduc'ed tomato 
sauce. 

a I'Indienne — Indian Fashion. 

Eggs on a bed of rice with cream curry sauce. 

a ritalienne — ItalidM Style. 

Broiled sHces of ham on risotto, and eggs on the 
ham; surrounded with tomato sauce. 



48 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 

Eggs MoUet (soft) — Oeufs Mollet 

d la Mexicam. — Mexican Style. 

Eggs served in crusts filled with shrimps (stewed 
with onions, tomatoes and red sweet peppers), with 
Cream sauce poured over the eggs. 

a la Montebello — Montebello. 

Eggs on pate de foie gras toast; thick Bearnaise 
sauce mixed with puree of tomatoes poured over. 

a la Montglas — Montglas. 

Eggs on crusts filled with a brown ragoiit of mush- 
rooms, truffles, beeftongue, and chicken cut in 
squares. 

a la Nantua — Nantua. 

Eggs on crusts, filled with crayfish tails stewed in 
cream. 

a I'Oseille — with Sorrel. 

Eggs served on a bed of sorrel. 

d I'Ostendoise — Ostend Fashion,. 

Eggs on crusts, filled with oysters in cream sauce. 

a la Parisienne — Parisian Fashion. 

Eggs on artichoke bottoms ; cream sauce with truffles 
poured over. 

d la Persanne^-Persian Fashion. 

Eggs on a bed of plain boiled rice, surrounded with 
a brown curry sauce with onions, ham, and stewed 
prunes cut in small squares. 

d la puree d'Artichauts — with puree of Artichokes. 
d la puree d'Asperges — with puree of Asparagus, 
a la puree de Celeri — zvith puree of Celery, 
a la pwree de Marrons — with puree of Chestnuts. 



EggSj and Hozv to Use Them. 49 

Eggs MoUet (soft) — Oeufs MoUet 

d la puree de Topinatnbours — mith puree af Girasoles 
or Jerusalem Artichokes. 
Eggs can be served right on the puree ; or the puree 
can be served in crust and eggs on top. 

a la Raphael — Raphael. 

Eggs covered with anchovy sauce with crayfish tails 
or lobster cut in squares. 

a la Ravigote — Ravigote. 

Eggs covered with veloute sauce, finished with, 
green butter — (tarragon, chervil, parsley, etc., par- 
boiled and pounded with butter). 

d la Reine — Queen Style. 

Eggs on crusts filled with puree of chicken; cream 
sauce. 

d la Royale — Royal Fashion. 

Eggs on crusts filled with truffles and beeftongue 
cut in small squares and stewed in cream. 

a la Sidney — Sidney. 

Eggs with cream curry sauce with shredded chicken 
■ and ham. Rice may be served separate. 

d la Vatel — Vatel. 

Eggs on fried slices of bread, covered with cream 
sauce mixed with shredded mushrooms and beef- 
tongue. 

a la Verdi — Verdi. 

Eggs with cream sauce mixed with puree of onions. 
In the centre of eggs serve fresh mushrooms sauted 
in butter. 

d la Zurlo — Zurlo. 

Eggs on flat and oval-shaped potato croquettes; 
cream sauce with chopped ham, truffles and parsley 
around them. 



50 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 



Scrambled Eggs. 



OF all the many ways in which eggs can be prepared 
for the table, there is none which, as* a rule, is 
liable to be so unsatisfactory as when they are scrambled; 
In order that a dish of scrambled eggs should appear 
at its best, it ought to be served immediately after leav- 
ing the hands of the cook, as eggs in that form are liable 
to rapid deterioration in tastefulness and quality. 

Some cooks use cream, or cream sauce, to keep 
scrambled eggs in good condition for a reasonable period 
of time. I do not recommend the use of sauce unless it 
be absolutely necessary, as I consider cream more satis- 
factory. It should be remembered that the most im- 
portant point in cooking eggs is never to overcook them. 
Scrambled eggs, that are dried up when served, are not 
only lacking in tastefulness, but they are also difficult 
of digestion. Here is a recipe that will give satisfaction 
if the directions are strictly followed out: 

Butter a flat saute pan liberally, put into it six well 
beaten eggs, season with salt and pepper, and put on the 
fire. Keep stirring continually with an egg whisk, or 
wooden spoon, until the eggs become creamlike itj con- 
sistency; when they are sufficiently done add about two 
ounces of good butter, and serve immediately. If 
scrambled eggs cannot be served as soon as cooked, a 
little cream, about one tablespoonful to two eggs, may 
be added; cooked this way they are more custardlike in 
appearance. 



Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 51 

Oeufs Brouilles — Scrambled Eggs 

aux Anchois — with Anchovies. 

Boneless anchovies cut in small pieces mixed with 
plain scrambled eggs. 

aux Artichauts — mth Artichokes. 

Artichokes cut into dices mixed with scrambled 
eggs. 

a la d'Aumale—d'Aumale. 

Scrambled eggs with kidneys, garnished with small 
puff-paste crusts filled with thick puree of tomatoes. 

a la Balzac — Balzac. 

Scrambled eggs with shredded beeftongue and 
truffles, garnished with crusts filled with soubise. 

a la Bordelaise — Bordeaux Style. 

Scrambled eggs with fried cubes of bread aftd cepes ; 
chopped fine herbs added when cooked. 

a la Bretonne — Brittany Style. 

Scrambled eggs served on toast, with minced onions 
in thick brown sauce in the centre. 

a la Cervelle de Veau — with Calf's Brains. 

Calf's brains cut in cubes mixed with the eggs. 

aux Champignons — with Mushrooms. 

These can be served either with or without sauce. 
In the first case, if fresh mushrooms are used they 
are cooked in butter and mixed with sufficient brown 
sauce, which must be of good consistency; the 
scrambled eggs are dished up and the stewed mush- 
rooms put in the centre. If no sauce is required 
the mushrooms are cut in cubes, cooked in butter 
and mixed with the eggs. 

o la Conitesse Uruska — Countess Uruska Style. 

Scrambled eggs with asparagus tips, and crayfish 
or lobster cut in cubes, served on toast; surrounded 
with tomato sauce. 



52 E^^s, and How to Use Them. 



^i>i> 



Oetifg Brouilles — Scrambled Eggs 

aux Crevettes — with Shrimps. 

Shrimps cut in squares mixed with the eggs. 

en Croustade — in Crusts. 

These crusts can be made either of bread or puff- 
paste. (See with poached eggs.) 

a la Dieppoi^e — Dieppe Style. 

Scrambled eggs with oysters arid mushrooms, served 
in small puff-paste patties. 

d la Dumas — Dumas Style. 

Eggs scrambled with fine herbs, served on toast and 
garnished with small grilled mushrooms and slices 
of bacon. 

a I'Ecarlate — Ecarlate Style. 

Serve the eggs on buttered toast, make a hollow in 
the center and fill with beef tongue, cut in small 
squares and added to thickly reduced Madeira sauce. 

a I'Espagnole — Spanish Style. 

Onions, green peppers, ham and tomatoes cooked 
in oil or butter, mixed with the eggs, or if preferred, 
can be dished up in the centre of the eggs. 

d I'Estragon — with Tarragon. 

Tarragon leaves are parboiled, chopped, and then 
mixed with the eggs. 

aux Fines Herbes — with Fine Herbs. 

The professional cook knows of two kinds of fine 
herbs, the raw and the cooked ; the raw consists of 
chopped parsley, chervil and chives, sometimes tar- 
ragon ; the cooked fine herbs are prepared with mush- 
rooms, shallots and parsley, all chopped fine and 
cooked in butter. 

For scrambled eggs, or omelette with fine herbs, the 
raw herbs are generally used unless otherwise speci- 
fied. 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. S3 

Oeufs Brouilles — Scrambled Eggs 

d la Forestiere — Forester's Fashion. 

Scrambled eggs mixed with previously cooked mush- 
rooms and bacon (both cut in small cubes). 

a la Frangaise — French style. 

Artichoke bottoms, previously heated in broth, are 
filled with scrambled eggs mixed with chopped 
truffles, sprinkled over with grated cheese and melted 
butter; put in the oven for a minute; served with 
brown sauce. 

au Fromage — with Cheese. 

Plain scrambled eggs, to which, when they are 
cooked, some grated Parmesan or Gruyere cheese is 
added. 

a la Geo. de Forest Grant — Geo. de Forest Grant. 

Plunge some good sized green peppers into very 
hot fat, so that the outer skin may be detached by 
rubbing with a napkin, cut off the stalk end and 
empty out the seeds, boil for about ten minutes in 
salted water, and then fill them with scrambled eggs ; 
serve them upside down wifh a glazed slice of truffles 
on each, and Madeira sauce on the dish. 

a la Georgette — Georgette Style. 

Scrambled eggs with shrimps, served in scooped out 
halves of baked potatoes. 

a la Gordon — Gordon Style. 

Crusts filled with scrambled eggs with truffles. With 
slices of parboiled marrow dipped in meat glaze 
placed on top. 

au Hareng Saur — with Smoked Herring. 

Skinned and boned smoked herring cut into small 
pieces, tossed in butter for a few minutes, and mixed 
with the eggs. 



54 £SS^' ^"^ Hoiv to Use Them. 

Oeufs Brouilles — Scrambled £ggs 

(mx Huitres — zi'ith Ovsters. 

The bearded oysters are cooked with a Httle of their 
own gravy; when cooked, cream sauce is added in 
proportion and dished up in the centre of the eggs. 
Or, the soft part of the oysters are cut into squares 
and cooked, the liquid strained and the oysters mixed 
with the eggs. 

au Jambon — with Ham. 

Ham cut in small cubes, fried in butter and mixed 
with eggs. 

au Jus — zvith Gravy. 

Eggs served on toast, surrounded with good veal 
gravy. 

a la Livingstone — Livingstone. 

Eggs on toast spread with puree of gooseliver, or 
pate de foie gras. 

a la Lyonaise — Lyonese Style. 

Onions minced finely, smothered in butter and 
mixed with the eggs. 

d la Marseillaise — Marseille Style. 

Tomatoes cooked in olive oil, mixed with scrambled 
eggs, which, previously to being cooked, were beaten 
in a bowl rubbed with garlic. 

a la Montglais — Montglas Style. 

Truffles, muslirooms, cooked breast of chicken and 
smoked beeftongue, cut in small squares, stewed for 
a few minutes in well reduced Madeira sauce, dished 
up in the centre of the eggs. 

a la Mornay — Mornay Style. 

Mushrooms and shrimps cut in dice, mixed with 
eggs. 



Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 55 

Oeufs Brouilles — Scrambled Eggs 

a la Nerac — Nerac Style. 

Eggs served on Pate de foie gras toast, with glazed 
slices of truffles on top and surrounded with truffle 
sauce. 

a la Offenbach — Offenbach Style. 

Tunny, crayfish tails and anchovies cut in small 
squares mixed with the eggs, garnished with small 
puff-paste crusts filled with thick tomato puree. 

au.v Oignons-^uith Onions. 

Eggs mixed with chopped onions previously smoth- 
ered in butter. 

a. la Orientate — Oriental Style. 

Eggs cooked with anchovy butter dished up over 
tomatoes cut in halves and baked in the oven. 

an Pain — with Bread. 

Small squares of fried white bread, mixed with the 
eggs. (In German-Switzerland this dish is called 
Vogelheu.) 

au Parmesan — with Parmesan Cheese. 

Scrambled eggs mixed with grated Parmesan cheese. 

au.v Petits Pois — with Green Peas. 
Green peas mixed with the eggs. 

au Petit Sale Fume — with Bacon. 

Thin rashers of bacon cut in small strips, fried and 
mixed with the eggs; or, the bacon may be broiled 
and served as garnishing around the eggs. 

aux Piments Verts — with Green Peppers. 

phopped green peppers cooked in butter and mixed 
with the eggs. 

aux Pointes d'Asperges — with Asparagus Tips. 

Cooked asparagus tips cut small and mixed with 
the eggs. 



56 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 

Oeufs Brouilles — Scrambled Eggs 

a la Princesse — Princess Style. 

Scrambled eggs with truffles, served in crusts made 
of puff-paste; a little veal gravy served over the 
eggs. 

a la Provencale — Provencial Style. 

Onions and tomatoes smothered in oil, mixed with 
the eggs, and garnished with small stuffed mush- 
rooms. 

a la Puree de Celeri — with Puree, of Celery. 
Eggs mixed with puree of celery. 

a la Reine — Queen Style. 

Cooked breast of chicken and truffles cut in very 
small cubes, mixed with the eggs. Hard eggs are 
hollowed, heated in salted water and filled with 
the scrambled eggs ; served on cream sauce. 

a la Ribot — Ribot Style. 

Firm fresh tomatoes are scooped out with the vege- 
table spoon, seasoned and cooked in the oven, then 
filled up with scrambled eggs, covered with a nice 
slice of truffle glazed over, and set on light cream 
sauce. 

d la Cafe Riche — Cafe Riche Style. 

Eggs with lobster and truffles cut in cubes, served 
on toast; tomato sauce finished with lobster butter 
on the dish. 

au Ris de Veau — with Sweetbread. 

Sweetbread, previously parboiled, is cut in dices and 
cooked in butter; it may be mixed thus with the 
eggs, or either brown or white sauce may be added ; 
if this is done the sweetbread must be dished up in 
the centre of the eggs. 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 57 

Oeiifs Brouilles — Scrambled Eggs 

aux Rognons — with Kidneys. 

Veal or lamb kidneys, cut in cubes, cooked in very 
hot butter over a brisk , fire. When sufficiently 
cooked they are put into a well reduced Madeira 
sauce and dished up in the centre of the eggs. The 
kidneys should not be allowed to boil in the sauce, 
nor should they be overdone lest they become tough 
and indigestible. 

aux Rognons et Champignons — with Kidneys, and 
Mushrooms. 

Same as above with the addition of mushrooms. 

d la St. Denis — St. Denis Style. 

Eggs served on artichoke bottoms and surrounded 
with small round croquettes of sweetbread. 

au Saumon Fume — ■with Smoked Salmon. 

Smoked salmon cut into thin strips, cooked in but- 
ter for a few minutes and mixed with the eggs. 

a la Suisse — Swiss Style. 

Gruyere cheese cut in small cubes, mixed with the 
eggs when they are done. 

aux Tomates — with Tomatoes. 

Fresh tomatoes are peeled and the seeds pressed 
out, then cut in small pieces and cooked with but- 
ter and mixed with the eggs. 

a la Tosca — Tosca Style. 

Equal pai-ts of cooked breast of chicken, parboiled 
oysters and braised celery (cut in small cubes and 
mixed with cream sauce) placed in the center ot the 
scrambled eggs. 



58 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 

Oeufs Brouilles — Scrambled Eggs 

aux T ruffes — with Truffles. 

These can be served like scrambled eggs with mush- 
rooms, either with or without sauce; truffles are cut 
into cubes, and if served with sauce, put into Ma- 
deira sauce and dished up in the centre of the eggs ; 
the other way the truffles are mixed with the eggs, 
and nice slices of glazed truffles are laid on top of 
them. 

a la Turque — Ttwkish Style. 

Eggs served on fried slices of tomatoes and gar- 
nished with fried eggplant, cut out in crescents. 

a I' Union Club — Union Club Style. 

Pimentos morrones, or red sweet peppers, are heated 
in salt water and filled up with scrambled eggs and 
truffles ; Madeira sauce on the dish. 

a la Valencienne — Valencia Style. 

Scrambled eggs with red sweet peppers, served in 
artichoke bottoms. Tomato sauce on the dish. 

a la Volontaire— Volunteer Style. 

Truffles, olives, mushrooms and red peppers (cut 
in small squares and mixed with thickly reduced 
Madeira sauce), served in the center of the scram^ 
bled eggs. 



E-ggs, and HoTV to Use Them. 59 



Shirred Eggs(Oeufs sur le Plat) 
— Eggs au Miroir. 



MANY persons have asked the writer what the dif- 
ference is between shirred eggs and eggs au 
miroir. According to the modern school of cookery, the 
difference is as follows : shirred eggs are cooked in a 
small china dish, especially made for the purpose, and 
are served therein ; while eggs au miroir are also cooked 
in the same kind of dish, but when done they are cut with 
a round paste cutter, and served either on toast, crusts', 
or the garnishing directly. These are the teachings of 
the overrefined modern school. In the good old days no 
difference was made between a shirred egg and an egg 
au miroir. 

In cooking shirred eggs, butter the dish lightly, break 
into it either three or four eggs, pour hot melted butter 
over the yolks, and cook in a slow oven for a few min- 
utes, until the yolk looks as though it was coveted with 
a veil. 

•The seasoning of eggs, if no sauce accompanies them, 
should be left to the eater, as salt and pepper destroy 
the beauty of a well cooked egg. 

The following description of garnishings can be 
adapted to either shirred eggs on the dish directly, or 
eggs cut out and served on toasts. 



60 Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 

Shirred Eggs (Oeufs sur le Plat) — Oeufs au Miroir 

a la A dele — A dele Fashion. 

Eggs (when cooked) garnished with mushrooms 
(cut in squares and atewed in Madeira sauce) and 
broiled sausages cut in halves lengthwise. 

o I'aigre doux — with Sweet-Sour Sauce. 
(See poached eggs.) 

a I'Alsacienne — Alsatian Style. 

Slices of boiled salt pork on the dish, grated Gruyere 
cheese sprinkled over; eggs broken on top covered 
with a little thick cream and cooked for a few min- 
utes in a slow oven. 

aM.ii; Anchois — with Anchovies. 

Chopped anchovies on the dish, eggs over them. 

a I'Angladse — English Fashion. 

Broiled strips of bacon on the dish, eggs over them, 
or the eggs may be cooked plain and the bacon 
served on top. 

a la Bayonnaise — Bayonne Style. 

Slices of ham on the dish, eggs on top ; when cooked 
cover with tomato sauce. 

a la Bercy — Bercy. 

Eggs cooked plain, garnished with small sausages 
and tomato sauce. 

au Beurre noir — with brown (black) Butter. 

Eggs cooked plain, brown butter poured over. 
Brown Butter : put two ounces of butter in a frying- 
pan, turn the latter gently until the butter becomes 
brown, then add a tablespoonful of vinegar. 

aux Champignons — with Mushrooms. 

Eggs cooked plain, garnished with mushrooms cut 
in squares and stewed in Madeira sauce. 



Eggs, and Hoiv to Use Them. 61 

Shirred Eggs (Oeufs sur le Plat) — Oeufs au Miroir 

d la Chasseur — Hunter's Style. • "^ 

Eggs garnished with chicken livers sauted with 
mushrooms and shallots in Madeira sauce mixed 
with a dash of Tomato sauce. 

a la Chipolata — Chipolata. 

Eggs cooked plain, garnished with chestnuts cooked 
in broth, glazed small onions, small sausages, and 
Madeira sauce. 

a la Cluny — Cluny Style. 

Same as Bercy Style, but instead of sausages use 
small chicken croquettes. 

a la Colbert — Colbert. 

Eggs cooked plain, covered with Colbert sauce. 

a la Creme — vuith Cream. 

Good thick cream on the dish, eggs broken into the 
same, and cooked in a slow oven. 

a la Creole — Creole Style. 

Ham cut in small squares, onions, green peppers 
and mushrooms sliced and all smothered in butter, 
fresh tomatoes peeled, squeezed and cut in quarters, 
and a little beef extract are added, and the whole 
cooked for IS minutes ; put this on the dish, break 
the eggs over it, and cook in a slow oven. 

a la de Lesseps — De Lesseps Style. 

.Eggs garnished with calf's brains. Brown butter 
poured over. 

a la Derby — Derby. 

Eggs cooked plain, garnished with fat gooseliver, 
and mushrooms cut in squares, with brown sauce. 

a la Diabie — Deviled. 

Eggs cooked plain, deviled sauce poured over. 



62 EggSj and How to Use Them. 

Shirred Eggs (Oeufs sur le Plat) — Oeufs au Miroir 

a la DucJiesse — Duchess Style. 

Proceed as for Nesselrode Style, but use mashed 
potatoes instead of puree of chestnuts. 

a I' Etudiante — Student's Fashion. 

Eggs cooked plain, garnished with stewed kidneys 
and truffles in thick tomato sauce. 

a la Fermiere — Farmer's Fashion. 

Eggs cooked plain, garnished with chicken livers 
stewed with onions and mushrooms. 

a la Florentine — Florence Style. 

Cover shirred egg dishes with a thin layer of plain 
spinach and sprinkle with grated cheese. Set the 
eggs on top of ithe spinach, cover them with a thin 
Cream sauce (mixed with grated cheese) and bake 
in a brisk oven. 

a la Folette — Folette Style. 

Spread puree of sorrel on the dish, make a hollow 
and lay the yolks in. Whip the whites to a stiff 
froth, place over the sorrel, sprinrkle with grated 
cheese and melted butter and bake in a medium 
oven. 

d la Gouife — Gouffe. 

Same as a la Creme, with the addition of grated 
Parmesan cheese. 

a la Grecqu^ — Greek Style. 

Eggs garnished with &gg plant, cut in squares and 
sauted in butter. Tomato sauce poured around. 

ail Jambon ou au Lard — with Ham or Bacon. 

Fried or broiled slices of ham or bacon on the but- 
tered dish, eggs broken on top, and cooked- in a slow 
oven. 



^■ggs, and How to Use Them. 63 

Shirred Eggs (Oeufs sur le Plat) — Oeufs au Miroir 

a la Jockey Club — Jockey Club Style. 

Eggs cooked plain, garnished with veal kidneys, 
mushrooms, and truffles cut in squares and stewed 
, in Madeira sauce. 

a la Jules Janin — Jules Jcmin. 

Eggs on slices of fat goose liver with tomato sauce, 

au Jus-^with Grbvy. 

Eggs cooked plain, with rich gravy poured over 
when done. 

a la Knapp — Knapp Style. 

Eggs with brown butter, garnished with sausages 
(split and broiled). 

a la Lorraine — Lorraine Fashion. 

Same as a la Crane, with the addition of -chives and 
grated cheese. 

a la Marchamd de Vin — Wine Merchants' Style. 

Eggs garnished with small sausages (split and 
broiled). Marrow sauce poured over. 

a la Marigny — Marigny Style. 

Put stewed tomatoes on the egg dish; break the 
eggs on top and cook. Pour Lobster sauce on the 
white part of the eggs. 

a la Meyerbeer^Meyerbeer. 

Eggs cooked plain, with broiled lamb's kidneys and 
truffle sauce. 

d la Montagnarde — Mountaineer's Fashion. 

Eggs garnished with stewed veal, kidneys, mush- 
rooms, and small sausages in Madeira sauce. 



64 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 

Shirred Eggs (Oeufs sur le Plat) — Oeufs au Miroir 

d la Montwrgis — Montargis. 

Eggs around a ragout of shredded chicken livers 
(previously cooked), mushrooms, and beef tongue, 
mixed with thick cream sauce, besprinkled with 
cheese and gratinated; when done a little tomato 
sauce is poured around the eggs. 

a la Mousquetadre — Musketeer Fashion. 

Eggs garnished with finely sliced lamb's kidneys 
and onions in cream. ' 

a la Negus — Negus. 

Eggs garnished with small chicken or game cro- 
quettes and truffle sauce. 

a la Nesselrode — Nesselrode Style. 

Butter the dish and with a channelled tube affixed 
to a pastry bag make on it a border of puree of 
chestnuts. Pour two tablespoonfuls of thick cream 
on the dish, break the eggs into the cream and 
bake in the oven. 

aux Oignons — with Onions. 

Sliced onions smothered in butter are put on the 
dish, or the eggs are cooked plain and onion sauce 
is served with them. 

a la Omer Pacha — Omer Pacha. 

Sliced onions and quartered tomatoes cooked to- 
gether in butter are put on the egg dish, the eggs 
broken on top, and cooked in a slow oven. 

a r Opera — Opera Style. 

Garnish the eggs with clusters of stewed chicken 
livers and asparagus tips tossed in butter. 

au Parmesan — with Parmesan Cheese. 

The grated cheese is strewn on the buttered egg dish 
and also some over the eggs, and then cooked in a 
slow oven. 



Eggs, and Hozu to Use Them. 65 

Shirred Eggs (Oeufs sur le Plat) — Oeufs au Miroif 

a la Provengale^Provencial Fashion. 

Eggs garnished with halves of tomatoes cooked in 
oil. 

a la Reine — Queen Style. 

Eggs garnished with breast of chicken, mushrooms 
and truffles cut in small squares and stewed in cream. 

d la Rossini — Rossini. 

Eggs garnished with slices of fat goose liver and 
truffle sauce. 

d la St. Germain — St. Germain Style. 

Proceed as for the Nesselrode Style, but instead 
of puree of chestnuts use puree of peas. 

a la Geo. Sand — Geo. Sand Style. 

Eggs garnished with broiled mushrooms and as- 
paragus tips tossed in butter. 

aux Sardines — ztdth Sardines. 

Sardines are skinned, split and boned and put on 
the dish, the eggs broken on top, and cooked in a 
slow oven. 

aux Saucisses — with Sausages. 

Eggs cooked plain, garnished with small sausages. 

a la Suisse — Swiss Fashion. 

Strew grated Gruyere (Swiss) cheese over the 
eggs, pour nut butter over and cook in the oven. 

aux Tomates — with Tomatoes. 

Eggs garnished with tomatoes stewed in butter. 

d la Turbigo — Turbigo. 

Eggs garnished with small broiled sausages and 
Bordelaise sauce. 



66 Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 

Shirred Eggs (Oeufs sur le Plat) — Oeufs au Miroir 

d la Venitienne. 

Anchovies and sweet peppers are cut in small 
squares, mixed with tomatoes stewed in butter and 
put on the dish; eggs broken on top and cooked in 
a slow oven. 

d la Vicomtesse — Viscountess Style. 

Eggs garnished with asparagus tips tossed in but- 
ter. Pour over Hollandaise sauce and strew 
chopped or finely shredded truffles. 

d la Victoria — Victoria Style. 

Lobster and truffles cut in small squares added to 
lobster sauce and poured over the white part of 
the eggs. 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 67 



Fried Eggs. 



THERE are two distinctly different methods of fry- 
ing egfgs, one of which may be termed the French, 
and the other the EngHsh or American method. 

The French cook includes under the head of frying, 
anything that is immersed and cooked in very hot fat, 
either oil, lard or butter ; while the English and American 
cooks apply the term to anything that is cooked with 
.the aid of a fatty substance. A French cook, to whom 
the English or American customs are unknown, will, 
therefore, when asked to serve a fried egg, plunge the 
egg into a large quantit)' of fat, similar to the way eggs 
are poached in water. The English or American cook 
would simply melt a little butter in a frying-pan, break 
the eggs into it, and cook them only on one side ; or, as 
many do, when cooking ham, or bacon and eggs, cook the 
meat first and then fry the eggs in the remaining fat. 

In addition to those two ■vy^ys, poached eggs or eggs 
mollet can also be fried ; they simply need to be breaded 
with beaten eggs and bread crumbs, and then be im- 
mersed in some hot fatty substance. 

It lies with the cook, or the consumer, to have the 
eggs fried just as his taste, directs. The garnishings de- 
scribed later on can, with few exceptions, be adapted to 
any way in which eggs are fried. 



68 E.ggs, and How to Use Them. 

RECIPES FOR FRYING EGGS. 

First or French method : Put a half pint of olive oil, 
lard or clarified butter into a frying-pan and, place over 
a good fire; when hot, break gently one by one (without 
bursting the yolk) into the pan) with a wooden spoon 
turn the white gently over the yolk, so as to envelop the 
latter. When sufficiently cooked, take the egg out with 
a skimmer, and put it on a napkin so that the latter may 
absorb all the fat, then turn the egg, and place over the 
garnishing. It is always best to fry only one egg at a 
time. 

Second method : Melt one ounce of butter in a frying- 
pan, and when it begins to hiss break into it, gently, three 
or four eggs, scald the yolk with a little hot melted but- 
ter, and cook in a slow oven for two or three minutes. 

The second method is the one most commonly followed 
by our domestic cooks. Many persons, who have an 
aversion to fried food, can eat eggs fried in this way, 
when it would be impossible for them to do sO if the 
eggs were fried according to the first, or French method. 



Eggs, and Horn to Use Them. 69 

Fried Eggs — Oeufs Frits 

d I' AUenumde^— German Style. 

Eggs on a bed of spinach with shredded smoked 
cooked beef tongue in Madeira sauce around on 
the dish. 

a I'Anglaise — English Fashion. 

Eggs on fried or broiled ham or bacon. 

d la Bayonnaise — Bayonne Fashion. 

Eggs on broiled Bayonne ham, tomato sauce over 
the ham. 

a la Berenger — Berenger. 

Artichoke bottoms covered with stewed tomatoes, 
an egg fried in oil on each artichoke and between 
each tgg a small slice of broiled ham. 

& la Bordelaise — Bordeaux Fashion. 

Eggs on Bordeaux sauce garnished with marrow 
and mushrooms. 

a la Conde — Conde. 

Eggs on ■ a puree prepared of % haricots, beans, 
and Yi spinach; broiled ham as garnishing. 

a la Creole — Creole Style. 

Eggs on sauce as prepared for "Shirred Eggs & la 
■:reole." 

& I'Espagnole — Spanish Style. 

Slices of bread are dipped in beaten tgg and fried 
in oil, the ham also fried in oil is put oh the bread, 
the eggs on the ham; tomato sauce is poured over 
the whole. 

aux Epinards — with Spinach. 

Eggs served on a bed of chopped spinach. 



70 Egi^j ond How to Use Them. 

Fried Eggs — Oeufs Frits 

a I'huile — in Oil. 

Eggs fried in oil. 

au Jamhon — with Ham. 
Eggs served on ham. 

d la Jules Janin— Jules Janin. 

Eggs on pate de foie gras toast; tomato sauce 
poured over. 

a la Proz'engale — Proveneial Fashion. 

Eggs fried in oil, served on halves of tomatoes baked 
in the oven ; tomato sauce (with a suspicion of garlic) 
on the dish. 

d, la Reforme — Reform. 

Eggs fried in oil served on a garnishing of shredded 
truffles, mushrooms, beef tongue, gherkins and the 
white of a hard boiled tgg, stewed in brown sauce 
mixed with a little red currant jelly. 

Fried Poached Eggs — Oeufs Poches, Frits 

d, la Cicile — Cecil. 

Poached eggs dipped into beaten eggs and fresh 
bread crumbs, then plunged into very hot fat for one 
minute and a half; tomato sauce finished with 
lobster butter served separate. 

d la Colbert — Colbert. 

Eggs cooked as above, served with Colbert sauce. 

d, la Montebello—Montebello. 

Eggs prepared as "a la Cecile;" Bearnaise sauce 
mixed with puree of tomatoes served separate. 



Eggs,- and Hozv to Use Them. 71 

Fried Poached Eggs — Oeufs Poches, Frits 

a la Villeroi — Villeroi. 

Poached eggs coated with Villeroi sauce. When 
very cold they are rolled into fresh bread crumbs 
and then dipped in beaten eggs, rolled once more 
in bread crumbs and then fried in very hot fat; 
served with tomato or Bearnaise sauce. 
Villeroi Smice: Reduce some veloute sauce with 
rich veal stock and some cream, until of good con- 
sistency, thicken with a few &gg yolks and pass 
through a sauce towel; when cold use for the eggs. 
Villeroi sauce must be gelatinous or else it will not 
become firm when cold ; we therefore recommend the 
use of veal stock. 



72 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 



Bggs in Cocottes or Cases. 



THE preparation of eggs in cocottes, or in cases, is 
entirely the same, the difference being merely in 
the cocottes or cases themselves. Cocottes have, gen- 
erally, the shape of a small saucepan, deep enough to 
contain one egg and the garnishing. They are made of 
porcelain, and have a handle attached; though there 
are some. of different shapes and designs. Cases are made 
either of paper or porcelain ; if the former are used they 
should be slightly oiled on the outside, and dried for a 
few minutes in a slow oven. This is done to make them 
resist the humidity. To handle cases easier when serv- 
ing them to guests, they should be put in silver stands 
similar to those in which the glasses containing soda 
water are served. 

Eggs cooked in china cases, or cocottes, should be put 
in a pan surrounded with water ; they require to be in the 
oven from six to ten minutes, according to the heat and 
the preparation. 

In many recipes the cocottes, or cases, are lined with 
a coating of forcemeat; and these certainly require 
longer time to cook than those where only a garnishing 
is laid on the bottom. 



^Si^) '^^'^ Hozv to Use Them. 73 

Eggs in Cocottes — Oeufs en Cocottes 

a la Bedford — Bedford. 

The ccx:ottes are lined with liver forcemeat, leaving 
a hollow space in the centre in which the raw egg 
is broken ; they are cooked in the oven, for eight to 
ten minutes, and before serving, besprinkled with 
chopped beeftongue and truffles. 

a la Cherbourg — Cherbourg Style. 

The cocottes are lined with fine fish forcemeat and 
mixed with chopped truffles and lobster, the eggs 
are put in the centre and cooked in the oven; when 
done a little tomato sauce is poured on the top. 

a la Creme au Gratin — Baked in Cream. 

A spoonful of thick cream is put on the bottom 
of the cocotte, the egg broken into it, seasoned with 
salt and pepper, and covered with more cream, and 
then cooked in the oven from six to eight minutes. 

& la Creole — Creole Style. 

See Shirred Eggs a la Creole. 

a la Du Barry — Du Barry Style. 

Line the cases with chicken forcemeat mixed with 
chopped beef tongue and truffles ; ■ break in the 
eggs and cook in the oven. When done, cover 
with puree of cauliflower. 

aiiji^ Fines Herbes Cuites — with Cooked Fine Herbs. 
Chopped shallots and mushrooms are cooked in 
butter, when done a little chopped parsley and 
chervil is added, this is put on the bottom of the 
cocottes, the eggs broken on top and cooked in the 
oven; when done a little rich gravy may be poured 
over the eggs. 

d, la Gouffe — Gouife. 

Same as "Cocottes a la Creme au Gratin;" instead 
of sweet cream sour cream is used, and the eggs 
besprinkled with gfated cheese. 



74 EggSj and How to Use Them. 

Eggs in Cocottes — Oeufs en Cocottes 

a I'ltalienne — Italian Style. 

Chopped shallots, onions and mushrooms are cooked 
in butter and reduced with white wine, half brown 
and half tomato sauce is added and cooked for a 
while ; this sauce is put on the bottom of the cocottes, 
the eggs on top and cooked in the oven for six or 
seven minutes. 

a la Leontine — Leontine. 

Cocottes are lined with fish forcemeat mixed with 
crayfish tails and truffles cut in small squares, eggs 
broken into the centre, cooked in the oven, and 
when done covered with tomato sauce. 

a la Mo/rly — Marly. 

Two spoonfuls each of chopped crayfish tails or 
lobster, chopped mushrooms and bread crumbs are 
mixed with one ounce of butter and two yolks of 
eggs so as to form a smooth paste, season well, and 
with this line some cocottes and break an egg into 
the centre of each ; cook in the oven and cover with 
a little cream sauce before serving. 

a la Reine-^Queen's Fashion. 

Breast of cooked chicken, mushrooms and truffles 
are cut into small squares, mixed with cream sauce 
and put on the bottom of the cocottes, the eggs on 
top; cooked in the oven for six to seven minutes. 

a la Victoria — Victoria. 

Lobster, mushrooms and truffles cut into small 
squares are mixed with cream sauce finished with 
lobster butter; this is put on the bottom of the 
cocottes, eggs on top and cooked in the oven ; when 
done covered with tomato sauce. 



Eggs, and Hoiv to Use Them. 75 

Eggs in Cocottes^ — Oeufs en Cocottes 

d la Voltaire — Voltaire Style. 

Line the cases with chicken force meat, break in 
the eggs and cook in the oven. When done, cover 
with puree of asparagus. 

Eggs in CaseSi — Oeufs en Caisses 

d la Bonnefemme — Bonnefemme. ' 

Prepare a paste of two spoonfuls each of fresh bread 
crumbs and cooked fine herbs, two yolks of eggs and 
one ounce of butter ; line the cases with this mixture, 
leaving a hollow space in the centre, break one egg 
into each and cook in the oven from eight to ten 
minutes ; when done garnish with finely-cut anchovy 
fillets. 

a la Cairola — Carola. 

Cases are lined with cream chicken forcemeat mixed 
with shredded mushrooms and beeftongue, the eggs 
broken into the centre and cooked in the oven ; when 
done they are besprinkled with chopped truffles. 

a la Colbert — Colbert. 

The cases are lined with chicken forcemeat mixed 
with chopped truffles, the eggs put in the centre and 
cooked in the oven ; when done covered with Colbert 
sauce. 

aux Crevettes — with Shrimps. 

Shrimps cut in squares and stewed in cream are put 
on the bottom of the cases and the eggs on top; 
cooked from six to eight minutes. 

a la Czarine — Csarina Style. 

Cases lined with game forcemeat and chopped 
truffles, eggs in the centre; when cooked covered 
with brown sauce reduced with game stock. 

aux Ecrevisses — with Crayfish. 

Prepared in the same manner as "with Shrimps." 



76^ ^SS^y ^^^ How to Use Them. 

Eggs in Cases — Oeufs en Caisses 

& la Edison — Edison. 

Cases lined with chicken forcemeat mixed with 
puree of goose liver ; on the bottom of the case comes 
a layer of brown truffle sauce, the egg on top of it 
and covered with the rest of the forcemeat; cooked 
in a slow oven; when done glazed over with beef 
extract. 

a la Florentine — Florence Style. 

Line the cocottes with plain spinach tossed in but- 
ter, break the eggs into the center, and put in the 
oven. When half done, cover with Cream sauce, 
strew over grated cheese and finish to cook in the 
oven. 

aux Hultres — with Oysters. 

The soft part of oysters is cut in two and stewed 
in cream sauce; this is put on the bottom of the 
cases, the egg broken over it and cooked in the oven. 

a la Jaures — laures. 

Ham, truffles and crayfish tails cut in small. squares, 
stewed in Madeira sauce, put on the bottom of the 
cases, eggs over it and covered with a little lobster 
butter; when cooked a glazed slice of truffle is laid 
on each egg. 

a la Lorraine — Lorraine Style. 

Eggs in cream mixed with grated cheese and chives, 

d la Lucullus — Lucullus. 

Puree of foie gras mixed with chopped truffles on 
the bottom of the cases, eggs broken on top, and 
when cooked covered with Madeira sauce. 

a la Ma/rignam, — Marignan. 

The cases are lined with chicken forcemeat mixed 
with chopped mushrooms, fresh bread crumbs, yolks 
of eggs and butter; eggs are put in the centre, and 
when done besprinkled with chopped beeftongue and 
truffles. 



EgS^, o/nd Hoiv to Use Them. 77 

Eggs in Cases — Oeufs en Caisses 

d, la Monte Carlo — Monte Carlo Style. 

Chopped truffles and mushrooms mixed with a little 
beef extract put on the bottom of the cases, eggs 
broken on top, and when cooked covered with slices 
of truffles glazed over. 

d la Montfort — Montfort. 

The cases are lined with fish forcemeat mixed with 
chopped lobster, eggs broken into the centre, and 
when cooked covered with lobster sauce. 

a la Perigoiirdine — Perigord Style. 

Line the cocottes with puree of foie gras, add the 
eggs and cook in the oven. When done, cover 
with Perigueux (truffle) sauce. 

d, la Puree de TomAte — with pitree of Tomatoes. 

The eggs are broken on a layer of puree of toma- 
• toes, and when cooked covered with another layer 
of the same puree. 

au Ris de Veau — with Sweetbread. 

Sweetbread cut in squares and stewed in cream put 
on the bottom of the cases, eggs on top, and when 
done covered with a little cream sauce. 

aux Trulfes — with Truffles. 

Truffles cut in squares mixed with Madeira sauce 
put on the bottom of the cases, eggs on top, and 
when done covered with a slice of truffle glazed over. 

a la Vatel — Vatel. 

Sweetbread and truffles cut in squares mixed with 
puree of tomatoes ; eggs broken on top and covered 
with thick cream ; besprinkle with bread crumbs and 
cook in the oven. 



78 £gS^> '^"'^ Hozv to Use Them. 



Eggs Moulded in Timbales. 



THE term timbale, in cookery, is applied to anything 
having the shape of a small goblet; the meaning, 
however, has been greatly extended in the course of time, 
so much so, indeed, that many moulds of different shapes 
are termed timbales. 

The preparation of eggs moulded in timbales requires 
the same treatment as for eggs in cocottes, or eggs in 
cases, with this difference only, that they are not served 
in moulds, but are turned out upon the dish or plate, 
retaining the form of the mould. 

Eggs prepared in this manner should always be cooked 
in the bainmarie or water bath. 



Egg^i (^lid Hozv to Use Them. 79 

Eggs Moulded in Timbales — Oeufs Moules en 
Timbales 

a I'Arlcquin — Ha/rlequin Fashion. 

Buttered timbale moulds are besprinkled with 
chopped beeftongue, truffles and parsley, and then 
lined with a thin layer of chicken forcemeat, an tgg 
broken in the centre, and cooked in the oven from 
six to eight minutes; served on tomato sauce. 

a la Cardinal — Cardinal Style. 

Buttered timbale moulds besprinkled with chopped 
lobster coral, an egg broken in each, and cooked 
for six minutes ; served with lobster sauce. 

a, la Colbert — Colbert. 

Buttered timbale moulds, fancifully decorated with 
truffles, are lined with a thin layer of chicken force- 
meat ; eggs in the centre ; cooked as usual and served 
with Colbert sauce. 

a la Comtesse — Countess Fashion. 

Timbale moulds are lined as a la Colbert, and filled 
with scrambled eggs with asparagus tips, cooked just 
long enough until the forcemeat is done; served on 
veloute cream sauce. 

a la Coquelicot — Coquelicot. 

Parboiled sweet red peppers are put into buttered 
timbale moulds so that they adopt the shape of the 
mould, eggs broken into them and cooked as usual; 
served with cream sauce. 

d la Georgette — Georgette Style. 

Cook the eggs in buttered moulds (besprinkled with 
truffles), serve them on broiled mushrooms and pour 
over tarragon gravy^. 

a la Henri IV. — Henry IV. 

Eggs cooked in moulds and served with Bearnaise 
sauce. 



80 Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 

Eggs Moulded in Timbales — Oeufs Moules en 
Timbales 

a la Maintenon — Maintenon. 

Moulds besprinkled with chopped beeftongue, 
truffles and parsley; eggs cooked as usual; served 
with truffle sauce. 

& la Marechale — Marechale. 

Timbale moulds buttered with anchovy butter, one 
egg and the yolk of one egg put in each mould, 
cooked very soft and served with anchovy sauce. 

a la Polignac — Polignac. 

Timbale moulds besprinkled with chopped truffles; 
eggs cooked as Usual; served with HoUandaise 
sauce. 

a la Portugmse — Portugiiese Fashion. 

Besprinkle the buttered timbale moulds with chopped 
parsley, break in the eggs, cook in the bainmarie and 
serve on halves of tomatoes (previously broiled). 
Tomato sauce on the dish. 

a la puree d'Asperges — with puree of Asparagus. 

a, la puree de Marrons — zvith puree of Chestnuts. 

a la puree de Tomates — with puree of Tomatoes. 

Eggs moulded in timbales can be served with a great 
variety of purees; the moulds can be decorated ac- 
cording to the eater's or the cook's own taste. 
The puree is served under the eggs. 

a la Renaissance — Renaissance Style. 

Proceed as for ct la Colbert; serve with green Hol- 
landaise sauce. 

d la Scobeleif — Scoheleff. 

Eggs cooked in moulds and served with rich tar- 
ragon gravy. 

a la Vicom^tesse — Viscountess Fashion. 

Besprinkle the buttered moulds with truffles, add the 
eggs and cook; serve on small artichoke bottoms, 
pour over Cream sauce (blended with puree of aspa- 
ragus) and place on top of each timbale a glazed 
slice of truffle. 



Ei^gSj and Hoiv to Use Them. 81 



Hard Eggs. Stuffed Eggs. 

Cold Eggs. 



IN order that eggs should be properly hard boiled, they 
should be put into boiling water and allowed to re- 
main there ten minutes, and then cooled off in cold water. 
If cooked longer than ten minutes the yolk will acquire 
a blackish tint, and the white will exhale a disagreeable 
odor. A peculiar fact, which few persons are aware of, 
is that eggs which are cooked and cooled off, and then 
prove to be not sufficiently done, cannot be cooked any 
more if put back again into the boiling water. Hard 
boiled eggs can be kept a long time without decomposing, 
and they are therefore a very handy article of food for 
travelers. 

Stuffed eggs are usually prepared from hard eggs; 
the yolk is taken out and mixed \yith some sauce and 
other ingredients, and then put back into the egg. 

Eggs cooked in any style can be eaten when cold, 
though hard boiled eggs are most commonly eaten in 
that way. 



82 Eggs, and Hoiv to Use Them. 

Hard Eggs — Oeufs Durs 

a I'Aurore — Aurora. 

Hard eggs, of which the yolk is retained, are cut 
in sUces and mixed with cream sauce, put into a 
dish and besprinkled with the yolks which are 
squeezed through a wire sieve, and some melted 
butter ; put in the oven for a few minutes and served 
before they are browned too much. 

a la Bechamel — Bechamel. 

Hard eggs cut lengthwise in four; cream sauce 
poured over and gratinated. 

a la Bernardine — Bernardine. 

Hards eggs cut in slices and covered with crayfish 
sauce mixed with puree of onions. 

d la Chicoree — with Chicory. 

Hards eggs cut in quarters, served on a bed of 
chicory, surrounded with rich gravy. 

en Coquille — in Shell. 

Most of the different styles in which hard eggs 
are cooked can be served in shells ; this way of 
serving them is especially recommendable to facili- 
tate the service. 

a la Dreux — Dreux. 

Sliced hard boiled eggs mixed with cream sauce 
and garnished with sliced truffles, mushrooms and 
ham, put in shells and gratinated. 

aux Epinards — ivith Spinach. 

Hard eggs cut lengthwise in quarters on a bed of 
chopped spinach surrounded with rich gravy. 

a la Haz'anaise — Havana Style. 

Proceed as for Eggs, Chiinay style. Place each half 
egg on. a half tomato (previously cooked in the oven), 
pour Mornay sauce over the egg and gratinate in the 
oven. 



Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 83 

Hard Eggs — Oeufs Durs 

di la Hongroise — Hungarian Fashion. 

Same as "Eggs a la Tripe" with the addition of 
fine herbs and paprika pepper. 

a I'Indienne — Indian Style. 

Eggs cut in halves on a bed of boiled rice sur- 
rounded with cream curry sauce. 

a la Mmtre d' Hotel — Maitre d' Hotel. 

Hard eggs cut in sHces arranged on a dish and cov- 
ered with maitre d'hotel butter. 

d la Mathurin — Mathurin. 

Hard eggs cut in sHces, arranged on a dish by lay- 
ers, alternated with the soft part of oysters cooked 
in white wine, and sliced onions smothered in butter 
and mixed with matelote sauce. 

d la Norfolk — Norfolk Fashion. 

Hard eggs cut lengthwise in halves, dipped into 
beaten eggs and rolled in fresh bread crumbs, fried 
in hot fat and served with piquant sauce. 

aux Nouilles a la Italienne — zvith Noodles, Italian Fashion. 
Border of noodles with hard eggs cut in quarters 
and covered with tomato sauce in the centre. 

a I'Oseille — with Sorrel. 

Eggs cut in quarters on a bed of sorrel surrounded 
with rich gravy. 

<J la Reine — Queen's Fashion. 

SHce the eggs, add to Cream sauce with sliced mush- 
rooms and truffles, put in cases or shells, besprinkled 
with bread crumbs, grated cheese and melted butter, 
and bake in the oven. 

d la Religieuse — Nun's Fashion. 

Hard eggs cut in slices, covered with butter mixed 
with cheese and lightly gratinated. 



84 Eggs, and Hoiv to Use Them. 

Hard Eggs^ — Oevifs Durs 

a la Robert — Robert. 

Hard eggs cut in quarters with onions and mustard 
sauce. 

d, la Soubise — Soubise. 

Eggs cut in quarters served with cream &nion puree. 

d la Tripe — as Tripe. 

Minced onions are lightly smothered in butter and 
mixed with cream sauce; hard eggs cut in slices 
added 'to it and heated without boiling., 

d la Tyrolienne — Tyrolean Style. 

Eggs stuffed with the bruised yolks to which have 
been added finely chopped smoked beef tongue, 
mushrooms and a little Bechamel sauce. Give the 
eggs their natural shape, egg and bread crumb them, 
fry in hot lard and serve with tomato sauce. 

a la Verdi — Verdi Style. 

Place the quartered eggs on a bed of rice cooked with 
broth (to which has been added grated Parmesan 
cheese and foie gras cut in small cubes). Pour over 
Mornay sauce and bake in the oven. 

Stuffed Eggs (hard)— Oeufs Farcis 

a I' Allemande — German Fashion. 

Eggs cut in halves, the yolk taken out and mixed 
with a stuffing prepared with bread soaked in milk; 
two whole eggs and the yolk of three raw ones, 
seasoned with pepper, salt, and nutmeg; the eggs 
are stuffed with this mixture, the rest is diluted 
with cream and put on a dish, the eggs on top, be- 
sprinkled with bread crumbs and melted butter and. 
baked in the oven. 



Eggs, and Hoi^' to Use Them. 85 

Stuffed Eggs (hard) — Oeufs Farcis 

& la d'Annecy — d'Ann^cy. 

Eggs cut in halves, the yolks cut up and mixed 
with chopped onions and mushrooms previously 
cooked in butter, some raw yolk of egg is added, 
and the mixture put back in the eggs and gratinated ; 
serve with cream sauce. 

a la Bennet — Bennef. 

Eggs cut in halves or in the shape of a barrel, the 
yolk taken out and mixed with chopped anchovies, 
fine herbs arid some cream sauce ; the eggs are filled 
with this and put on a shirred egg dish, besprinkled 
with bread crumbs and melted butter; baked in the 
oven. 

a la Carmelite — Carmelite. 

Eggs stuffed with onions, parsley, sorrel, and the 
chopped yolks, baked in the oven. 

a la Celerini — Celerim Style. 

Eggs quartered, laid on a bed of spinach (covered 
with Cream sauce, mixed with grated cheese) and 
baked in a brisk oven. 

aux Champignons — zt^jV/t Mushrooms. 

Mushrooms cut in small squares, mixed with the 
chopped yolks of eggs and some white sauce; the 
eggs stuffed with this mixture, dipped in beaten 
eggs and rolled in bread crumbs and fried in hot fat. 

a la Chasseur — Hunter's Fashion. 

Eggs stuffed with game forcemeat; served with 
brown sauce. 

a la Chimay—Chimay Style. 

Cut the eggs in halves lengthwise. Chop the yolks 
very fine and mix with d'Uxelle or cooked fine 
herbs. Fill the eggs with this mixture, place on "a 
buttered dish, pour over Mornay sauce and bake 
in a brisk oven. 



86 Eggs, and Hoiv to Use Than. 

Stuffed Eggs (hard) — Oeufs Farcis 

a la Cointesse — Countess Style. 

Eggs cut lengthwise in halves, the yolk taken out 
and pounded with cooked chicken, some butter and 
a litle cream sauce; baked in the oven, and served 
oyer a puree of cauliflower. 

a la Constance — Constance. 

Eggs stuffed with chicken, ham and mushrooms cut 
in small cubes, mixed with the chopped yolk and 
some cream sauce ; gratinated and served with cream 
sauce. 

d la Dauphine — Dauphine. 

Eggs stuffed with chicken, and the yolks of eggs 
pounded together with cream sauce, baked in the 
oven; served with Madeira sauce. 

aux Epinards — ivith Spinach. 

Eggs cut in barrel shape, the yolk taken out, filled 
with spinach, a round slice of beeftongue of the 
same circumference as the egg is placed on top of 
each; served with a rich gravy. 

a la Fabri — Fabri Style. 

Eggs cut in quarters and placed on a buttered 
toast with chopped ham ; Veloute blended with 
Tomato sauce poured over. 

a la Fedora — Fedora. 

Eggs stuffed with a puree of gooseliver mixed with 
the chopped yolk served with truffle sauce. 

d la Garfield — Gariield. 

Eggs stuffed with forcemeat made of cooked 
chicken, ham and the ' yolk of eggs mixed with 
cream sauce, dipped in beaten egg, rolled in bread 
crumbs and fried in hot fat; served with piquant 
, sauce. 



Eggs, and Hozv to Use Thcni. 87 

Stuffed Eggs (hard) — Oeufs Farcis 

a la Gibson — Gibson Style. 

Proceed as for stuffed eggs, Tyrolean Fashion, but 
instead of Tomato sauce serve with puree of cel- 
ery. 

aii.Y Huitres — with Oysters. 

Soft part of oysters cut in four, cooked with white 
wine, mixed with cream sauce and the chopped 
yolks of eggs. Eggs stuffed with this, besprinkled 
with bread crumbs and melted butter and then 
gratinated. ' 

a I'Indienne — Indian Style. 

Eggs stuffed with curried rice mixed with the 
chopped yolk and cream sauce. 

a I'ltalienne — Italian Fashion. 

Eggs cut lengthwise into halves, stuffed with 
shallots, mushrooms and fine herbs cooked in butter 
and mixed with the chopped yolks of eggs, dipped 
in beaten eggs rolled in bread crumbs, fried in hot 
fat and served with tomato sauce. 

a la Leda — Leda Style. 

Proceed as for eggs a la tripe, fill some artichoke 
bottoms, sprinkle over with grated cheese, bread 
crumbs and melted butter and bake in a brisk 
oven. 

a la MagdU — Magda Style. 

Cut the eggs in halves. Mix the finely chopped 
yolks with half the amount of grated Swiss cheese, 
chopped fine herbs and a little French mustard. 
Stuff each egg with this mixture and give it the 
shape of a whole tgg; bread and fry in hot lard. 
Serve with Piquant sauce. 



88 Egi^, ('nd Hozu to Use Them. 

Stuffed Eggs (hard) — Oeufs Farcis 

a la Marius — Marius Style. 

Have ready some hard boiled eggs, cut off both 
ends so as to give the eggs the shape of a bairel 
and remove the yolks. Chop the yolk coarsely, 
add an equal amount of finely cut lobster, season 
to taste and bind with Mayonnaise sauce with 
chopped fine herbs and some partly melted jelly. 
Fill 1;he eggs with this preparation and besprinkle 
the top with chopped parsley, truffles and lobster 
coral. 

a la New Yorkaise — Nciv York Style. 

Cut six hard eggs in squares and mix with half 
the amount of fresh mushrooms (cut up the same 
size and cooked in butter) and enough Cream 
sauce to bind the eggs ; season well and fill into 
good sized green peppers from which the skins 
have been removed; heat well in the oven and 
serve with Madeira sauce. 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 89 

Cold Eggs— Oeufs Froids 

En Aspic — in Jelly. 

Jelly may be obtained from many different materials, 
but what is most commonly used nowadays, and 
which fully covers the purpose is prepared gelatine. 
Science has given ample proof that jelly contains no 
substantial nutriment even if made exclusively with 
calf's feet. Prepare with one pint of good stock 
and with one ounce of Keystone Silver White Gel- 
atine-, some jelly well seasoned and perfumed with 
half glass each of Madeira and white wine, fine 
herbs, spices, etc. Put some tartelet or small oval 
pudding moulds on ice, and with a round soft brush 
apply some of the cold though not stiffened jelly; 
after a coating of one-eighth of an inch of jelly is 
applied, decorate it to your fancy with ham, beef- 
tongue, truffles, green peas, white of hard boiled 
&gg, gherkins, tarragon leaves, chervil, lobster coral, 
etc. Have some hard boiled eggs peeled and cut 
lengthwise into halves, lay half of an tgg in each 
pan and fill up by degrees with the remaining jelly; 
leave stand until quite firm ; dip the moulds into 
warm water and turn out its contents on a dish. 
Egg mollet, or poached eggs, may be used instead 
of the hard boiled, or in place of using small moulds 
one large one may be employed. 

En Belle-vue — in Belle-vue. 
Same as the above. 

au Beurre d'Anchois — with Anchovy Butter. 

Eggs cut lengthwise into halves put on oval shaped 
toasts and decorated with anchovy butter. 

au Beurre de Montpellier — with Montpellier Butter. 

Same as the aforesaid ; instead of anchovy butter 
use butter pounded with parsley, tarragon, chervil, 
chives, capers, gherkins and some yolks of hard 
boiled eggs passed through a fine hair sieve; if not 
green enough, color with spinach green or Breton 
coloring. 



. 90 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 

Cold Eggs — Oeufs Froids 

a la Boulonaise — Boulogne Style. 

Egg mollet dished around a salad prepared of cauli- 
flower, crayfish, crahmeat, mussels, well seasoned 
with French mustard and fine herbs. 

a la Cumberland — Cumberland. 

Equal quantities of cooked chicken breast, ham, pate 
de foie gras and fresh grated Parmesan cheese 
pounded together and passed through a fine sieve; 
put some of this forcemeat on oval shaped slices of 
toast and place on each part of an egg cut length- 
wise into half, and then cut in slices ; between each 
slice put some finely cut beeftongue and gherkins, 
and decorate with jelly. 

a la Danoise — Danish Fashion. 

Eggs cut lengthwise into halves, filled with lobster 
salad covered with Mayonnaise sauce and decorated. 

a rEcarlaiB — Ecarlate Style. 

Proceed as for "a la Lucullus," but instead of 
sliced goose liver and truffles, use sliced beef 
tongue. 

a I'Estragon — with Tarragon. 

Eggs cut lengthwise into halves, decorated with par- 
boiled tarragon leaves and covered with jelly fla- 
vored with tarragon. 

a la Justine — Justine. 

Eggs cut lengthwise into halves scooped out and 
stuffed with a p^uree of pheasant mixed with whipped 
cream and covered with Chaudfroid sauce, reduced 
with game stock; when cold decorate with truffles 
and gherkins. 

a la Lucullus — Lucullus Style. 

Coat some small timbal molds with jelly; fill them 
up with alternate slices of truffle, fat goose liver 
and hard boiled egg and fill with partly melted 
jelly; allow to get thoroughly stiff and serve with 
chopped jelly around. 



Eggs, and Hozu to Use Them. 91 

Cold Eggs — Oeufs Froids 

Marines — Pickled. 

Hard eggs peeled and put into a jar; boiling vinegar 
flavored with spices and fine herbs poured over; 
ready for use in three or four days. 

d la Mayonnaise — zvith Mayonnaise. 

Hard eggs sliced and covered with Mayonnaise sauce. 

& la Mentonnaise — Menton Style. 

Eggs cut lengthwise into halves, the yolk taken out 
chopped with anchovies and capers. Eggs are filled 
with this stuffing and a slice of tunny laid on each ; 
decorated with jelly. 

a la Moscovite — Moscow Style. 

Eggs stuffed with Russian salad. 

a la Normande — Norman Style. 

Remove the skin from one dozen sardines, break 
them up in small pieces, lay in shells and place a 
cold poached egg on the top of each ^hell. Gar- 
nish the border of ithe shells with finely shredded 
lettuce leaves and over the eggs pour some Ravi- 
gote sauce and sprinkle over chopped fine herbs. 
Lay a few fresh shrimps around the egg and serve 
cold. 

a la Norvegienne — Norwegian Fashion. 

Eggs cut lengthwise into halves, yolks chopped with 
anchovies; white part of the eggs filled with this 
stuffing and decorated with stuffed olives and an- 
chovies cut in strips. 

d, la Polonaise — Polish Style. 

Egg filled with salad prepared of lobster, pickled 
oysters, and gherkins mixed with Mayonnaise sauce. 



92 Eggs, and Hoiv to Use Them. 

Cold Eggs — Oeufs Froids 

a la Ravigote — Ravigote Style. 

Prepare some poached eggs (have ithem rather 
hard so as to be able to handle them without fear 
of breaking them), place them (when cooked) in 
cold water, and, when thoroughly cold, drain and 
trim them. Cut slices of cold beef tongue the 
same shape as the eggs. Then lay the eggs on top 
of the tongue and coat with green Chaudfroid 
sauce. When set, brush over with jelly and allow 
to get very cold before serving. 

a la Russe — Russian Style. 

Eggs cut lengthwise into halves, the yolks scooped 
out, white part stuffed with caviare, and decorated 
with strips of anchovies and the chopped yolks. 

en Salade — Salad. 

Hard eggs cut lengthwise into quarters seasoned 
with salt, pepper, vinegar, and, oil, dressed on nice 
leaves of lettuce, and before serving besprinkle with 
fine herbs. ' 

en Sandwich — Sandwich. 

Buttered slices of bread with eggs cut in slices 

between. 

Any variety of egg sandwiches can be served, using 

Mayonnaise or anchovy butter for moistening the 

bread, adding watercress, lettuce leaves, fine herbs, 

etc., to the eggs. 

a la Strassbourgeoise — Strasshurg Style. 

Cut some hard boiled eggs lengthwise in halves 
and take out the yolks. Make a puree of the yolks, 
adding the same amount each of pate de foi gras 
and butter, then season to taste and fill up the 
eggs, giving them their original shape and mak- 
ing them stand on the thicker part. 
Coat the eggs with brown Chaudfroid sauce, deco- 
rate nicely and brush over with partly melted 
jelly. Serve on a border of jelly. 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 95 



Omelet. 



BRILLAT SAVARIN remarked very justly that, for 
an omelet to be excellent, it should never be made 
of more than twelve eggs. The writer goes still further, 
and says that, not more than eight eggs — and if the 
cook is not an adept in his profession, not more than six 
— should be used, as the production of an omelet, worthy 
of the name, is more difficult than many persons sup- 
pose, or than some are willing to admit. 

Three most important rules are to be followed in the 
preparation of an omelet. 

First: the omelet pan must be extremely clean, and 
never used for any other purpose. When not in use, it 
should always be left a little greasy; neither water nor 
any other liquid should ever come in contact with it. To 
clean the pan it should be slightly heated, and then 
rubbed with fine kitchen salt and a coarse towel, care 
being taken that the pan never becomes red-hot, as 
otherwise it is liable to become rough. 

Second: the eggs should be well beaten. Cooks who 
have a reputation for exactness of method, strain the 
eggs through a towel or a strainer, which gives the most 
satisfactory result, as the whites and the yolks become 
well mixed, and the omelet, when cooked, will not show 
those little white spots which are so often seen in omelets. 



94 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 

and which prove either the ignorance of the cook or his 
negligence in the preparation of them. 

Third : an omelet must always be cooked over a brisk 
fire; and here is where the ability of the cook is fully 
tested, as the quicker the omelet is made the better it is. 

Some cooks take pride in cooking omelets without 
stirring the eggs with a fork or a spoon, and it is true 
that some may succeed in this way; but, as a rule, such 
omelets are not so delicate as when the eggs are stirred 
while cooking. It is advisable to use a kitchen spoon 
for that purpose, as forks or other sharp utensils are 
likely to scratch the pan. 

RECIPE FOR OMELETS. 

Break six fresh eggs into a bowl, add a sufficient 
quantity of salt and pepper, and for every three eggs 
add one tablespoonful of thick cream; beat the egg well 
with an tgg whisk, or a fork, and strain into another 
bowl. Put two ounces of butter into the omelet pan, 
and when it is melted without being browned, turn in 
the eggs; stir continually with a kitchen spoon so that 
all the eggs are equally well cooked and are of the same 
consistency, keeping it very soft; leave it for two or 
three .seconds without stirring, and then fold it into 
three layers, beginning with the side nearest the handle ; 
this can be done with the spoon. Knock the bottom of 
the pan gently over the range so as to make the omelet 
move towards the outer part of the pan, and then fold 
the other part so that the omelet is a long oval in shape. 

To turn it out upon the dish, grasp the handle of the 
pan with the right hand, the thumb being uppermost and 
the palm of the hand underneath; hold the dish in the 
left hand, place the edge of the pan on the inner side of 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 95 

the dish, and turn the pan upside down, moving from 
right to left. 

All this should take but three or four minutes, and at 
the same time exercising the greatest care not to over- 
cook the omelet, as it is so much more difficult to fold 
when too greatly solidified. 

Some persons like omelets of a golden hue, and to 
attain this it is only necessary, when the omelet is folded, 
to leave it over the fire for a few seconds. Flat omelets 
are served occasionally, but they are not so delicate by 
far as those made according to the above recipe. 

In the following recipes the terms fiUed and garnished 
are applied. Filled means that the omelet should be 
stuffed inside before folding, and garnished means that 
the omelet when folded and on the dish should be 
adorned with the garnishing. Sweet omelets are de- 
scribed under a special heading. 



96 Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 

Omelette — Omelet 

a rAfricaiiic — African Style. 

Omelet filled with rice cooked in broth flavored 
with onions and green peppers. Tomato sauce 
around the omelet. Garnished with small slices 
of fried eggplant. 

a I'Ail — ivith Garlic. , 

The bo'wl in wliich the eggs for the omelet are 
beaten is previously rubbed with garlic. 

a I'Algerienne — Algerian Style. 

Omelet filled and garnished with artichoke bottoms 
cut in squares, and stewed in tomato sauce. 

it V Americaitu — American Fashion. 

Omelet filled and garnished with lobster cut in 
cubes, and stewed with tomatoes and fine herbs. 

a I'Aimral — Admiral Style. 

Omelette filled with oysters in cream surrounded 
with shrimp sauce and garnished with fried mus- 
sels a la Villeroi. 

a I'Anglaise — English Style. 

Plain omelet garnished with broiled strips of bacon. 

au.v Asperges^-with Asparagus Tips. 

Omelet garnished with cooked asparagus tips tossed 
in butter. Asparagus tips may also be mixed with 
the omelet. 

a la Bayonncdse — BcDyonne Style. 

Omelet filled with ham and red pepper cut in 
squares, surrounded with tomato sauce. 

a la B earnaise—B earnaise Style. 

Omelet filled with mushrooms and artichoke bot- 
toms cut in squares and stewed in tomato sauce. 
The top of the omelet garnished with rings of an- 
chovy fillets into which some cold Bearnaise sauce is 
put. 



Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 97 

Omelette — Omelet 

a la Bertini — Bertini Style. 

Omelette filled with risotto and garnished with 
celery (cut small and stewed in Veloute sauce). 

a la Bretonne — Brittany Style. 

One finely-sliced onion, the white of one leek and 
three well-cleaned fresh mushrooms sauted in but- 
ter and mixed with the eggs. 

aux Cepes — with Cepes. 

Omelet filled and garnished with cepes cut in dice, 
fried in oil and stewed in brown sauce. 

a la Cervelle — with Brains. 

Omelet filled and garnished with calf's brains cut 
in squares and stewed in cream sauce. 

aux Champignons — mth Mushrooms. 

Omelet filled and garnished with mushrooms cut in 
squares and stewed in iMadeira sauce. 

a la Charcutiere — Pork Butcher's Fashion. 

Omelet with bacon and onions, garnished with slices 
of bloodpudding and surrounded with mustard sauce. 

des Chasseurs — Hunter's Fashion. 

Omelet filled with puree of game, surrounded with 
Madeira sauce reduced with game stock. 

a la Chatelaine — Chatelaine. 

Omelet filled with mushrooms, truffles, breast of par- 
tridge and salt pork cut in squares and stewed in 
brown sauce. 

a la Chesapeake — Chesapeake Style. 

Fill and surround the omelette with oysters, celery 
and oyster crabs stewed a la Maryland. 

a la Ciboulette — with Chives. 

Chives mixed with the beaten eggs. 



98 Eggs, and Ho7v to Use Them. 

Omelette — Omelet 

aux Clams — with Hard Clams. 

Omelet filled and garnished with the belly part — i. e., 
the soft part of clams stewed in cream. 

aii,x Concombres — with Cucumbers. 

Omelet filled and garnished with cucumbers stewed 
in cream. 

aux Crates Durs — with Hard Crabs. 

Omelet filled and garnished with crab meat stewed 
in cream. 

aiix Crates d'Hmtres — with Oyster Crabs. 

This omelet may be served in three different ways. 

1. Plain, omelet garnished with fried oyster crabs. 

2. Oyster crabs fried in butter and mixed with the 
beaten eggs. 

3. Omelet filled and garnished with oyster crabs 
stewed in cream. 

aux Crevettes — zvith Shrimps. 

Omelet filled and garnished with shrimps stewed in 
cream. 

a la Derby — Derby. 

Omelet filled and garnished with fat gooseliver and 
mushrooms cut in squares and stewed in Madeira 
sauce. 

a la Diep poise — Dieppe Style. 

Omelet with fine herbs, filled with mussels and mush- 
rooms stewed in white wine sauce. 

a la Durand — Durand. 

Omelet filled with asparagus tips and truffles tossed 
in butter, garnished with artichoke bottoms and mush- 
rooms cut fine and stewed in cream. 

d I'Ecarlate — Ecarlate. 

Tliick puree of tomatoes well beaten up with the eggs 
in order that they may obtain a red tint; omelet 
covered with tomato sauce. 



Esg■s^ <^»d How to Use Them. 99 

Omelette^ — Omelet 

mix Ecrevisses — luith Crayfish. 

Omelet filled and garnished with crayfish stewed in 
cream. 

a I'Egyptienne — Egyptian Fashion. • 

Omelet filled and garnished with sliced breasts of 
quails and truffles stewed in brown sauce. 

aux Epinards — with Spinach. 

Omelet filled with spinach and surrounded with rich 
gravy. 

a I'EspagnoIe — Spanish Style. 

Finely shredded onions and green peppers smothered 
in oil with ham cut in squares; when sufficiently 
cooked add some peeled and squeezed tomatoes cut 
into eight parts, or if the tomatoes are large, in still 
more parts; stew gently for ten to twelve minutes, 
add some beef extract and fill and garnish the omelet 
with this preparation. Sometimes shrimps, oysters 
or sweetbread are added to the above. 

a I'Estragon — with Tairragon. 

Chopped tarragon mixed with the eggs. 

aux Fines Herbes — with Fine Herbs. 

Eggs for omelet mixed with finely chopped parsley, 
chives and chervil. 

aux Fines Herbes Cuites — with Cooked Fine Herbs. 

Eggs for omelet mixed with previously cooked and 
chopped shallots, mushrooms, parsley and chervil. 

d, la Flamcmde — Flemish Fashion. 

Omelet filled with spinach and garnished with calf's 
brains and brown sauce. 

aux Flews de Co-urge — zvith Pumpkin Buds. 

Pumpkin buds cut small, fried slightly in butter and 
mixed with the beaten eggs. 



100 Eggs, and How to Use Thciii. 

Omelettei — Omelet 

a la Florentine — Florence Style. 

Omelette filled with plain spinach tossed in butter 
and surrounded with cream sauce. 

aux Foies de Volcdlles — with Chicken Livers. 

Omelet filled and garnished with chicl^en livers cut 
in squares and stewed in Madeira sauce. 

aux Fmids d'Artichmcts — with Artichoke Bottoms. 

Artichoke bottoms cut in squares, fried in butter and 
mixed with the beaten eggs. 

au Fromage — with Cheese. 

Grated cheese mixed with beaten eggs ; the best sorts 
of cheese for this purpose are Parmesan or Gruyere. 

a la Grand-Due — Grand Duke's Fashion. 

Omelette with asparagus tips tossed in butter. 
Surrounded with truffle sauce. 

d, la Grecque — Greek Fashion. 

Omelet filled with egg plant (cut in cubes, sauted in 
butter and added to Madeira sauce). Tomato sauce 
flavored with onions and green pepper around the 
omelet. 

au Hareng Sour — zvith Smoked Herring. 

Smoked herring, boned and cut in small squares, 
fried in butter and mixed with the beaten eggs, 

a la Havanaise — Havana Style. 

Omelette with chicken livers and red peppers 
(sauted in Madeira sauce). 

a la Hollandaise — Dutch Style. 

The yolk of eggs mixed with fine herbs, the whites 
well whisked to froth and mixed with the yolks ; flat 
omelets are prepared from this mixture and served 
with sliced broiled smoked salmon. 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 101 

Omelette — Omelet 

an Homard — with Lobster. 

Omelets filled and garnished with lobster cut in 
squares and stewed in cream. 

a la Hongroise — Hungarian Style. 

Fill the omelette with onions smothered' in butter, 
cream sauce added, and season highly with pap- 
rika. 

aux HuUres — with Oysters. 

Omelet filled and garnished with the soft part of the 
oysters stewed in white wine and cream sauce. 

a la Ifalienne — Italian Style. 

Add to the eggs (before the omelette is cooked) 
some grated Parmesan cheese and garnish the 
omelette with stewed tomatoes. 

a I'Imperatrice — Empress Fashion. 

Omelet filled and garnished with soft part of oysters 
and sliced breast of chicken stewed in cream. 

a I'Indienne — Indian Style. 

Onions finely sliced, smothered in butter and mixed 
with the beaten eggs; seasoned with curry powder; 
omelet filled with boiled rice and served with currj 
cream savice. 

mi Jambon — with Ham. 

Ham cut iu small squares, fried in butter and mixed 
with the beaten eggs. 

a la Jasrdiniere — Gardener's Fashion. 

Onions sliced fine, smothered in butter 'and then 
mixed with the eggs ; omelet filled and garnished with 
carrots, turnips, peas, bean's, artichockes and mush- 
rooms cut in squares and stewed in cream; tomato 
sauce around the omelet. 



102 ESi^> ^'^^- fioiv to Use Thcin. 

Omelette — Omelet 

au Jus — lidth Gravy. 

Plain omelet surrounded with rich grav}-. 

a la Lanque de Boeuf Funue — with Snwked Becf-fongue. 
Same as "Omelet au Jambon." 

au Lard — with Bacon. 

1. The beaten eggs mixed with small pieces of fried 
bacon. 

2. Omelet garnished with broiled strips of bacon. 

a la Lorenzo — Loi'enso Style. 

Garnished with creamed crab flakes, mixed with 
chopped green peppers. The top of omelette gar- 
nished with glazed slices of truffles. 

a la Lyonaise — Lyonese Fashion. 

Onions sliced finely and smothered in butter, mixed 
with the beaten eggs and some grated Parmesan 
cheese. 

a la Macedoine — Matcedoine. 

Omelet filled and garnished with different kinds of 
vegetables stewed in cream. 

a la Maitre d' Hotel — Maltre d' Hotel. 

Omelet filled and garnished with sweetbreads cut in 
squares, cooked in butter with fine herbs and beef 
extract. 

a la Malako'ff — Malakoif Style. 

To four raw eggs add one tablespoonful of thickly- 
reduced tomato puree. Garnish the omelette with 
stewed fresh tomatoes, mixed with plain boiled 
rice. 

des Matelots — Sailors' Fashion. 

The bowl in which the eggs for. the omelet are beaten 
is rubbed with garlic; andiovies cut in small squares 
mixed with the eggs, omelet garnished with slices of 
smoked salmon and surrounded with tomato sauce. 



Egg^, (ind Hozv to Use Them. 103 

Omelette — Omelet 

a la- M edicts — M edicts . 

Omelet filled and garnished with breast of quail, truf- 
fles, an'd mushrcxjms cut in squares and stewed in 
Madeira sauce. 

a la Mexicaine — Mexican Fashion. 

Omelet filled and garnished with shrimps and sweet 
peppers cut small and stewed in shrimp sauce. 

rt la Milanaise — Milanese Fashion. 

Omelet filled and garnished with spaghetti cut one 
inch long and mixed with shredded truffles, ham, 
mushrooms, tomato sauce and grated Parmesan 
cheese. 

a la Moelle de Boeuf — with Beef Marrow. 

Omelet filled and garnished with beef marrow cut 
in squares, parboiled and stewed in brown sauce. 

a la Monselet — Monselet. 

Omelet filled and garnished witli truffles and arti- 
chokes cut in squares and stewed in cream; tomato 
sauce with beef extract around the omelet. 

a la MoMglas—Montglas. 

Omelet filled and garnished with ragout as for 
poached eggs. (See "Poached Eggs Montglas.") 

a la Mornay — Mornay. 

Omelet filled and garnished with sliced truffles and 
chicken stewed in cream^ sauce. 

aux Moules — with Mussels. 

Omelet filled and garnished with mussels stewed in 
white wine and cream. 

a la Mousseline — Foam Omelet. ■ 

The whites of eggs are well whisked to a stiff froth 
and mixed with the yolks ; cooked as usual. 



104 ^SS^) ('"d Hozv to Use Them. 

Omelette — Omelet 

a la Moicsseline cm Parmesan — Foam. Omelet with Par- 
mesan Cheese. 
Same as above with the addition of grated Parmesan 
cheese to the eggs. 

a la Nantim — Nantua Fashion. 

Omelet filled and garnished with crayfish and truf- 
fles stewed in cream sauce with crayfish butter. 

a la Normande — Norman Style. 

Omelet filled with oysters and shrimps and garnished 
with very small fried smelts. 

a la Nouvelle Orleans — Nezu Orleans Style. 

Omelette made with finely-sliced onions and green 
peppers, both previously cooked in butter. Gar- 
nish with okra stewed with fresh tomatoes. 

aux Oeufs d'Alose — with Shad Roe. 

1. Shad roes cut in small squares, fried in butter and 
mixed with the omelet. 

2. Omelet filled and garnished with shad roe pre- 
viously cooked and then cut in squares and stewed 
in cream. 

aux Oignons — zvith Onions. 

Onions sliced very fine, smothered in butter and then 
mixed with the beaten eggs. 

aux Oignons Nouveaux — with Spring Onions. 

Omelet garnished with small glazed spring onions. 

aux Olives — with Olives. 

Omelet filled and garnished with small olives stewed 
in brown sauce. 

aux Olives Farcies — with Stuffed Olives. 

1. Same as above only use olives stuffed with chicken 
forcemeat and chopped truffles. 

2. Stuffed olives mixed with beaten eggs; omelet 
cooked in the usual way. 



Eggs, and Hoiv to Use Them. 105 

Omelette — Omelet 

a I'Oseille — with Sorrel. 

'Sorrel cleaned and cut fine; cooked in butter until 
dry, and then mixed with the beaten eggs. 

a la Parisienne — Parisian Style. 

Omelet as "a, la Moiisseline,"' with the addition of 
chopped shallots, mushrooms, parsley, and ham 
cooked in butter. 

au Parmesan — mth Parmesan Cheese. 

Beaten eggs mixed with grated Parmesan cheese. 

a la Paysanne — Fairmers' Fashion. 

Tomatoes peeled and well squeezed, cut up and 
cooked in butter until all moisture is evaporated; 
then mixed with the beaten eggs and the omelet 
cooked as usual; served with brown sauce or rich 
gravy and garnished with little crusts, filled with 
puree of onions. 

au Persil — with Parsley. 

Chopped parsley mixed with eggs. 

au.v Petits Pais — with Green Peas. 

Green peas mixed with beaten eggs. 

a la Piemontaise — Piedmont Style. 

Omelette garnished with small timbals of risotto. 
Tomato sauce. 

aux Piments Verts — with Green Peppers. 

Qiopped green peppers cooked in butter 'and mixed 
with beaten eggs. 

aux Pointes d'Asperges — with Asparagus Tips. 

1. Cooked asparagus tips cut in small pieces and 
mixed with the eggs. 

2. Omelet filled and garnished with cooked asparagus 
tips steAved in cream sauce. 



106 E,ggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 

Omelette — ^Omelet 

mix Pointes de Houblon — with Hop Sprigs. 

Can be prepared as "with asparagus tips.'' 

aux Pommes de Terre — ivitk Potatoes. 

Raw potatoes cut in small squares fried in butter and 
mixed with the eggs. 

a la Portugaise — Poi'tuguese Style. 

Chopped fine herbs, olives, and anchovies mixed with 
the eggs ; omelet surrounded with tomato sauce. 

des Prelats — Prelate Fashion. 

Omelet garnished and filled witli herrings' soft roe, 
crab meat, crayfish tails, mushrooms and truffles 
stewed in white wine sauce. 

d la Princesse — Princess Fashion. 

Omelette filled with asparagus tips in cream. Top 
of the omelette garnished with glazed slices of 
truffles. Surrounded with cream sauce. 

d la Printaniere — Spring Omelette. 

A handful of well-cleaned sorrel (finely-shredded 
and cooked in butter), chopped parsley, chives 
and chervil mixed with eggs. Parsley sauce. 

d la Provencale — Provencial Style. 

Omelet filled with minced onions and garlic smoth- 
ered in oil, surrounded with tomato sauce. 

a la puree d'Artichauts — with puree of Artichokes. 

a la puree d'Asperges — with puree of Asparagus. 

a la puree de Cliampignons — with puree of Mushrooms. 

d la puree de Chouxfleurs — with puree of Cauliflower. 

h la puree d'Oseille — with puree of Sorrel. 

d la puree de Tomates — with puree of Tomatoes. 



^SS^> o-nd Hozv to Use Them. 107 

Omelette — Omelet 

d la puree de Volaille — imfh puree of Fowl. 

Omelets like poached eggs, or tgg mollets, can be 
served with a great variety of purees; the omelet is 
filled with the puree and surrounded with gravy or 
brown sauce. 

a la Reforme — Reform Club Style. 

Same garnishing as for "Fried Eggs a la Reforme." 

a la Reine — Queen Style. 

Fill the omelette with puree of chicken and place 
on top glazed slices of truffles. Cream sauce 
around the omelette. 

aux Ris de Veau — with Sweetbread. 

Omelet filled and garnished with sweetbread cut in 
squares and stewed in cream. 

a la Robert — Robert Fashion.. 

■ Omelet with onions and bacon. 

aux Rognofi-s de Monton — ivith Mutton Kidneys. 

Omelet filled and garnished with mutton kidneys cut 
in squares and stewed in Madeira sauce. 

aux Rognofis de Veau — zvith Veal Kidneys. 
Same as above. 

d, la Rossini — Rossini Style. 

Eggs mixed with fat goose liver and truffles cut in 
small squares. The top of the omelette may be 
garnished with glazed slices of truffles. Madeira 
sauce on the dish. 

a la Royale — Royal Style. 

Fill the omelette and garnish on the outside with 
truffles, sweetbreads, breast of chicken ,and mush- 
rooms (all previously cooked), cut in small 
squares and added- to supreme sauce mixed with 
one-third tomato sauce. 



108 Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 

Omelette — Omelet 

a la Russe — Russian Style. 

Small omelet filled with caviare; generally served 
cold ; but it can be served hot also. 

au.v Soft Ckmts — with Soft Clams. 

Prepared as with "Hard Clams;" should the soft 
clams be too large, they may be cut into halves, but it 
is preferable to have them small. 

a la Soubise — Soubise. 

Omelet filled with white puree of onions. 

d, la Suisse — Swiss Style. 

Gruyere cheese cut in small squares and mixed with 
the eggs. 

au Thon a la Brillat-Savarin — with Tunny Brillat-Savarin 
Style. 
The soft roe of carp cooked in water for a few min- 
utes is chopped with some tunny, then cooked in but- 
ter with chopped shallots and mixed with the beaten 
eggs. Omelet cooked as usual and served on a dish 
with melted maitre d'hotel butter. 
(See Brillat-Savarin's Omelette du Cure in his Physi- 
ologie du Gout.) 

aux Tomates — with Tomatoes. 

Omelet filled and garnished with tomatoes previously 
peeled, squeezed, cut in quarters and then stewed in 
butter. 

d, la Trafalgar — Trafalgar Style. 

Omelette surrounded with cream sauce and gar- 
nished with fried deviled whitebait. 

Tricolores — in Three Colors. 

'Small omelets of which one is cooked plain; one 
mixed with thick puree of tomatoes and one as ex- 
plained for "omelette verte" or green omelet. 



Egg-^j and Hozv to Use Them. 109 

Omelette — Omelet 

aux Truifes — with Truffles. 

1. Truffles cut in squares and mixed with the beaten 
eggs ; omelet surrounded with gravy. 

2. Omelet filled and garnished w^th truffles cut in 
squares and stewed in Madeira sauce. 

d, la Tyrolienne — Tyrolean Style. 

Omelette filled with stewed tomatoes and gar- 
nished with fried onions. 

Verte — Green Omelet. 

Chopped parsley, chervil, tarragon, chives, spinach 
and sorrel (the two latter previously cooked in but- 
ter) are mixed with the eggs ; omelet cooked as usual. 

des Voyageurs — Travelers' Omelet. 

Omelet cooked flat, put on a plate until cold and then 
filled with a puree prepared of cooked ham, chicken, 
and butter, seasoned with pepper, salt, and mustard ; 
the omelet is rolled like a French pancake and eaten 
cold. 

a la Zingara — Zingara Style. 

Omelette filled with shredded truffles, mushrooms 
and ham mixed with thickly reduced tomato 
sauce. The omelette surrounded with brown 
sauce. 

des Zouaves — Zouave Fashion. 

Chopped truffles, mushrooms, ham, and tarragon 
mixed with eggs; omelet cooked as usual and gar- 
nished with small crusts filled with puree of onions. 

Omelettes Sucrees — Sweet Omelets 

aux Bananes — with Bananas. 

Omelet filled and garnished with bananas cut in slices 
and cooked in syrup. Omelet bestrewn with pow- 
dered sugar and glazed with a red hot omelet iron. 



110 EggSj and How to Use Them. 

Omelettes Sucrees — Sweet Omelets 

a la Celestine — Celestinc. 

Small omelets alternately filled with Frangipane 
cream, apple and strawberry marmalade, etc., glazed 
as above. 

fiux Confitures — with Preserves. 

These omelets with souffle and rum omelets are most 
commonly known and served among sweet omelets. 
A sweet omelet before serving should always be 
strewn over with powdered sugar and glazed with the 
omelet iron, which must be red hot and dipped in 
water before using. Omelets can be filled with many 
different marmalades, jams, and jellies, and preserves 
as can be seen from the following: 

mix Abricots — with Apricot Jam. 

aux Coings — with Qidnce Marmalade. 

aux Praises — witJi Strawberry Jam. 

aux Pramboises — with Raspberry Jam. 

d la Gelee de Groseille — xmth Red Currant Jelly. 

a la Gelee de Guava — with Guava Jelly. 

aux Groseilles de Bar le Due — with Bar le Due Currants. 

d I' Orange — with Orange Marmalade. 

d la Dauphirte — Dauphine Style. 

Omelets filled with apple marmalade and garnished 
with whipped cream flavored with vanilla. 

a la Prangipame — with Prangipane Cream. 

Omelet filled with Frangipane cream prepared as fol- 
lows: 

Prangipane Cream: Mix together three egg yolks 
and one whole &gg, two ounces of powdered sugar, 
one ounce of butter, a little vanilla or lemon flavor- 
ing, four ounces of flour, and one gill each of milk 
and cream; put in a saucepan and set on the fire to 
boil, stirring continuously. As soon as it commences 
to boil take off the fire and add one ounce of nut but- 
ter ; it is then ready for use. If desired some crushed 
macaroons mav be added. 



EggSj and How to Use Them. Ill 

Omelettes Sucrees — Sweet Omelets 

aux Fruits Confits — with Preserved Fruits. 

Omelet filled and garnished with assorted preserved 
fruits, as peaches, pears, green gages, cherries, etc. 
Cut into small pieces and mixed with apricot marma- 
lade diluted with syrup, flavored with Kirschwasser, 
rum or other liquors. 

ail Kirschwasser— with Kirschwasser. 

Sweet omelet cooked plain, glazed as usual; before 
serving Kirschwasser is poured over the omelet and 
fire set to it. 

aux Pormnes — with Apples. 

Omelet filled with apples peeletj and cut in quarters, 
then minced fine and cooked with butter and sugar ; 
omelet cooked and glazed as usual. 

aux Pommes, d I'Alsacienne — with Apples, Alsatian 
Fashion. 
This is more a pancake than omelet; in Alsace, how- 
ever, it is called omelet and we shall therefore append 
it. Apples cooked as above are mixed with a batter 
prepared with one spoonful of flour, two whole eggs 
and one gill of cream seasoned with a pinch of salt 
and sugar ; cooked on both sides like a pancacke ; be- 
fore serving besprinkled with powdered sugar. 

au Rhum — with Rum. 

Prepared as "Omelette au Kirsch;" instead of the 
' latter rum is used. 

Souffle e Nature — Plain Puff Omelet. 

.There are four principal facts to. observe if one de- 
sires to have success when preparing puff omelets. 
1st. The yolks of eggs must be well mixed with the 
sugar until they become quite foamy. 2d. The 
whites must be whisked to a stiff froth. 3d. The 
omelet must be cooked in a hot oven. And 4th, the 



112 ^Sg^, O'^d How to Use Them. 

Omelettes Sucrees — Sweet Omelets 

omelet must be eaten immediately without delay if 
its quality should not deteriorate. 

RECIPE : 

The yolks of three eggs are gradually mixed with 
six tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar, until it becomes 
smooth and light; the whites -of six eggs are 
whisked to a stiff froth and then mixed with the 
yolks and the sugar; this must be done gently but 
quick, only taking a small part of the egg froth to 
commence with. A dish is buttered and bestrewn 
with powdered sugar, the e.gg mass put on it in an 
oblong shape, besprinkled with powdered sugar and 
cooked in a hot oven. 

Some cooks find pleasure in decorating the omelet ; 
but this is optional and left to the cook. Puff ome- 
lets can be flavored with various essences and. per- 
fumes, as can be seen from the following: 

SovMee omx Amandes — ivith Almonds. 

Same as above with the addition of pounded bitter 
almonds, or extract of almonds. 

SoufHee au Citron — imth Lemon. 

Same as plain puff omelet with the addition of lemon 
flavoring; either finely chopped rind of lemon, or 
lemon extract. 

SoiiMee au Chocolat — with Chocolate. 

Tablets of vanilla chocolate are heated in the oven 
until they are soft, then crushed and mixed with 
the sugar and yolks of eggs, the same proceedings 
as for plain puff omelet. 

SouMee aux Confitures— with Preserves. 

Same as "Vanilla Puff Omelet," with preserves in 
the centre of the omelet. 



Eggs, and How to Use Them. 113 

Omelettes Sucrees^ — Sweet Omelets 

SouMee aux Fleurs d'Orange — with Orange Blossom. 
Same as "Plain Puff Omelet" with the addition of 
orange blossom water. 

SoufHee mi Macaroons — with Macaroons. 

Crushedmacaroons are mixed with plain pyff omelet 
and cooked as usual. 

SouMee a la Vanille — with Vanilla. 

Plain puff omelet flavored with vanilla extract or the 
inner part of vanilla beans. 



114 EggS; and How to Use Them. 



Oeufs Sucres — Sweet Eggs. 



Crenie a I'Angiaise — English cream. 

Five yolks of eggs mixed with four ounces of 
powdered sugar are diluted with one pint of boiling 
rnilk, brought to the fire to thicken without boiling, 
stirring constantly. Flavor to taste, either witli 
vanilla, almonds, lemon, or orange flavor. 

Creme au Cafe — Caifee Custard. 

Half pound of roasted coffee thrown into one quart 
of boiling milk; covered herm,etically, and infused 
for a half hour, then strained through a fine sieve ; 
mixed with the yolks of six and the whites of three 
eggs, and six ounces of powdered sugar, all pre- 
viously beaten together ; strained once more and then 
filled into moulds— these are put into a pan with 
boiling water and pushed into a slack oven without 
permitting the water to boil ; when cooked put away 
to cool off ; unmold and serve when cold. 

Crem£ au Caramel — Caramcel Custard. 

Put a few lumps of sugar with the juice of a lemon, 
into a. copper pan, and put on the range; cook until 
of a light golden brown, and then pour into the 
mould in which the custard is to be cooked; when 
cold fill up with the same preparation as for Crime 
au Cafe, with the omission of coffee and cook as 
stated above. 

Creme au Citrofih— Lemon Custard. 

Same proportions as for coffee custard, but flavored 
with the rind of lemond instead of coffee. 



Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 115 

Oeufs Sucre? — Sweet Eggs 

Creme Meringuees — Meringue Custard. 

1. Custards cooked in small moulds, placed on round 
slices of sponge cakes^ covered and decorated with 
mdrisigue preparation. 

2. Pie dish lined with short paste or puff-paste trim- 
mings, filled with custard and baked in a slack oven, 
then covered and decorated with meringue mass. 
See "Meringue." 

Creme d, I'Orange — Orange Custard. 

Vanilla beans put into the milk before boiling, the 
same proceeding as for other custards. 

Crime a la Vanilla — Vanilla Custard. 

Same proportioa as stated above, flavored with 
orange rind. 

Meringue — Meringue. 

In cooking and confectionery two different sorts of 
meringue are prepared, which have this in common, 
that they are exclusively prepared with whipped 
whites of eggs and sugar. 

Meringue Ordinaire — Plain Meringue. 

The whites of twelve eggs are beaten to a stiff froth 
and gradually mixed with one pound of sifted 
powdered sugar. 

Meringue Italienne — Italiam Menw-^w^. 

One pound of sugar cooked to the blow degree is 
mixed and vigorously beaten with the froth of six 
egg whites. 

This preparation is not quite as light as "Plain 
■ Meringu£," but will be found useful on many oc- 
casions. 



116 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 

Oeufs Sucres — Sweet JJggs 

Meringues a la Chantilly — Chaniilly Meringites. 

Fill a pastry bag, into which a round tube of a half 
inch in diameter is slided, with plain meringue and 
press it out in the shape of a half tgg on to some 
trips of paper cut about two inches wide ; besprinkle 
with powdered sugar; place them on a thick board 
previously dampened, and bake in a very moderate 
oven with the door open until they are of a light 
color; meringues should be rather dried than baked. 
When they are sufficiently cooked, take them off 
the paper, and with the thumb make an impression 
on their flat side ; put them in a warm place to finish 
drying. 

When cold they are served with whipped cream 
flavored with vanilla. 

Meringues can be served with creams of different 
flavors, or with a sweet puree of chestnuts mixed 
with whipped cream; they can also be served with 
ice creams. 

Oeufs a la Neige — Snow Eggs or Floating Islands. 

Have two quarts of boiling milk in a flat shallow 
pan; with a tablespoon drop in some meringue 
preparation in the shape and size of an Ggg, then 
cover the pan and draw it to the edge of the range 
so that the meringue will cook without the milk boil- 
ing; when firm enough take out the meringues and 
lay them on a hair sieve. With the rest of the milk 
prepare an English cream, and when cold put on 
a dish and the meringue on top. 

Oeufs en Surprise au Blanc-manger — Surprise Eggs 
with Blanc-mange. 
Make little holes on both sides of raw eggs and 
blow out their contents into a bowl for further use. 
Qose up one of the holes with paste and through the 
other opening fill the tgg with Blanc-mange prepared 
as follows : Pound together half ounce of bitter and 



Eggs, and Hoiv to Use Them. 117 

Oeufs Sucres — Sweet Eggs 

eight ounces of sweet almonds with two tablespoon- 
f uls of orange flower water ; dilute with one pint of 
hot milk and one of cream; add nine sheets of Key- 
stone Silver IV kite Gelatine previously soaked in 
water, and when melted straip into a bowl. 
When the eggs are filled with this, set them on ice, 
and when firm, they are ready for serving. 

Oeufs en Surprise au Chdcolat— Surprise Eggs with 
Chocolate. 
Same proceedings as above; instead of almonds 
chocolate is used for flavoring. 

Pudding a la Moscovite — Moscow Pudding. 

Fill a pudding mould with plain meringue and cook 
in the water-bath as custard. When cold unmould 
and serve with English cream. 

Sabayon — Sabayon. 

Saybayon is most commonly served as a sauce, al- 
though it is often enough served ill glasses, as an 
entremet by itself. It is generally made with white 
wine, a dry wine being preferable, but it can also be 
prepared with sherry, Madeira, rum, Kirschwasser, 
brandy, etc. 

Put in a copper pan or basin five yolks and the white 
of one egg, with four ounces of powdered sugar, and 
a half wineglassful of dry white wine. Set it on a 
slow fire and whip vigorously until of the consistenc% 
of whipped cream', then serve in glasses or spread 
over the pudding as desired. 



118 EggSj and How to Use Them. 



Miscellaneous Recipes. 

Becassc Ecossaise — Scotch Woodcock. 

Many cooks when serving this dish simply dish up 
scrambled eggs on anchovy toast; but this is an er- 
ror, only the egg yolks should be used and be mixed . 
with cream. Proceed as follows : 
Beat four eggs with one gill of cream, season with 
salt and pepper, but in a sauce-pan over the fire, and 
stir continuously until thick without boiling, then 
pour this preparation over some anchovy toasts and 
serve. 

Beignets d'Oeufs — Egg Fritters. 

Hard boiled eggs cut lengthwise into halves, stuflfed 
with some kind of cooked forcemeat, dipped in fry- 
ing batter and fried in hot fat ; served on a napkin. 

Bouchees d'Oeufs a, la Creme — Small Patties of Eggs 
in Creaxm. 
Small patties filled with hard eggs cut in squares 
and tossed in cream sauce. 

Chomesquis d'Oeufs ainx Truffes — Egg Crovtesquis with 
TruMes. 
Hard eggs and truffles cut in squares, tossed in 
cream sauce, thickened with raw egg yolks and set 
aside to cool ; when cold wrap up some of this egg 
preparation in thin pancakes, then dip in frying bat- 
ter and fry in hot fat; serve on a napkin. 



Eggs, and Hozu to Use Them. 119 

Miscellaneous Recipes — Continued 

Cromesquis d^Oeufs a la Colbert — Eggs Cromesquis, Col-- 
bert Sauce. 

Prepare a mixture as for Egg Croquettes and' 
spread it on strips of pancakes about 2 inches 
wide by 3 long, roll up, dip in frying batter and 
fry in hot lard. Serve on a napkin with Colbert 
sauce separate. 

Croquettes d'Oeitfs — Egg Croquettes., 

Same preparation as "Egg Cromesquis;" instead of 
wrapping them in pancakes give ' them a nice oval 
shape, and dip in beaten eggs ; roll in bread crumbs, 
fry in hot fat and serve on a napkin. 

Croquettes (TOeufs a I'ltaliemie — Egg Croquettes, Italian 
Style. 
Cut eight hard boiled eggs in small squares and 
mix into one pint of thickly reduced cream sauce, 
season to taste with salt, pepper and grated nut- 
meg, add a good handful of grated Parmesan 
cheese and then put away to get cold. When 
cold, shape some croquettes, tgg and bread crumb 
them and fry in hot lard. Serve on a napkin with 
Tomato sauce separate. 

Fricasse d'Oeiifs a I'Anglaise — English Egg Fricassee. 
'Same as Hard Eggs "a la Tripe," with the addition 
of sliced mushrooms. 

Fritot d'Oeufs a la Frangaise — Fritot of Eggs, French 
Fashion. 
Cold poached eggs coated with thick truffle sauce 
put on an oiled dish and set on ice ; when very cold, 
dip them in frying batter and fry in very hot fat; 
serve on a «apkin. 

Fondue a la Brillat Savarin. 

Fondue is a mixture of cheese, eggs and cream,- and 

prepared as follows: 

Put eight tgg yolks in a pan with a half pound of 



120 EggSj and How to Use Them. 

Miscellaneous Recipes— Continued 

butter broken into little pieces, 4 ounces each of 
grated Parmesan and Gruyere cheese; season with 
salt and cayenne pepper; put on the fire and whisk 
continuously until of good consistency, then add two 
tablespoonfuls of thick cream; serve with toasted 
bread separate. 

The same can be made with ordinary American 
cheese. 

Hmtres du Bengale — Bengal Oysters. 

Eggs broken into cleansed and buttered oyster shells, 
seasoned with pepper and salt, besprinkled with 
bread crumbs and butter, and cooked in the oven for 
a few minutes. 

Huitres de Bombay— Bombay Oysters. 

An egg v/ith only half of its white is broken into a 
goblet seasoned with salt, pepper and lemon juice, 
or if liked with Worcestershire or Tabasco sauce, 
and swallowed with one draught. These eggs are 
sometimes called Prairie oysters. 

Oeufs Deu.v Freres — "Two Brother" Eggs. 

Prepare some scrambled eggs with Parmesan 
cheese and serve in tartlet crusts. On top of each 
lay one poached tgg, pour over rich veal gravy 
and serve. 

Oeufs Files pour Garnitures — Spun Eggs for Garnishing. 
Urbian Dubois in his "Cuisine de Tons les Pays," 
gives this recipe for spun eggs as a garnishing for 
Spanish ham. 

Beat the tgg yolks of fifteen eggs and pass them 
through a sieve. Boil some light syrup in a copper 
pan, and pour the tgg yolks through a funnel into 
the boiling syrup. This funnel, especially made for 
this purpose, should have several small tubes attach- 
ed at the bottom, which have an opening, about the 
size of large vermicelli. 
When the eggs are cooked they are taken out of the 



Eggs, and Hozv to Use Them. 121 

Miscellaneous Recipes — Continued 

syrup, laid on a hair sieve to strain, and besprinkled 
with a little cold water that they may not stick to 
each other. 

Oetifs Files pour Potage — Spun Eggs for Soup. 

Eight egg yolks mixed with 4 ounces of grated Par- 
mesan cheese and one tablespoonful of flour ; put this 
preparation into a pastry bag affixed with a round 
tube of a small opening and press the contents into 
boiling salted water. 

Oeiifs a la Gmnbetta — Eggs, Gambetta Style. 

One poached egg and one fried egg, both on toast, 
are garnished with calf's brains and truffie sauce. 

Oeiifs a la N'igoise — Eggs, Nice Style. 

Whites of eggs whipped to a stiff froth and mixed 
with thick cream and grated Parmesan cheese, put 
on a buttered dish and arrange nicely with small 
cavities large enough to lay in the yolks of eggs 
from which the whites were separated and whipped; 
cook in an oven of moderate temperature. 

Oeiifs a la Tomery — Eggs, Tomery Style. 

Soak a piece of bread the size of an egg in one 
gill of boiling milk; after it has absorbed all the 
liquor stir it well with a spoon, until a pulpy mass ; 
add a little piece of butter, season with pepper, salt 
and grated nutmeg*, add four spoonfuls of white 
chicken meat cut very fine, two spoonfuls of thick 
cream and four whole eggs well beaten; put this 
preparation into cocotte dishes and cook in a slow 
oven from twelve to fourteen minutes ; before serv- 
ing pour over some rich gravy mixed with tomato 
sauce. 

Oeu-fs en Robe de Chambre — Eggs Cooked in Potatoes. 
Cut off one end of some raw potatoes, s,tand them 
upright and bake in the oven. When cooked, cut 
off the other end, scoop out the potato and pour 
in some cream or Italian sauce, breajc a raw egg 



122 EgS^j '^'^'^ How to Use Them. 

Miscellaneous Recipes — Continued 

medium oven. When done serve on a folded 
into each, place the covers on top and cook in a 
napkin. 

Oeitfs SouMes a la Parmesanne — Eggs SouMed, Parme- 
san Style. 
Put into a bowl 5 egg yolks, and two tablespoon- 
fuls of thick creain, 1 ounce of butter, 5 table- 
spoonfuls of grated Parmesan cheese, salt and a 
pinch each of grated nutmeg and cayenne pepper ; 
blend all these ingredients thoroughly, then whip 
the 5 egg whites and mix into the yolks, etc. 
Fill up some small entree cases ^ of their height 
with ithe souffle prepai-ation, strew over some 
grated cheese and cook in a slow oven from 5 to 8 
minutes. Serve on a folded napkin. 

Pate d'Oeufs a I'Anglaise — English Egg and Bacon Pie. 
Lay some rashers of bacon on the bottom of a china 
pie dish ; pour over eight eggs beaten with a pint of 
cream and seasoned with salt and pepper, cover the 
dish with short crust or pufi'paste trimmings baked 
in a moderate oven; serve when cold. 

Rissoles d'Oeufs — Egg Rissoles. 

Roll out some puffpaste trimmings to the thickness 
of y% of an inch ; with the 'paste cutter stamp out 
some sound pieces of 2j4 inches in diameter, and in 
the centre lay a preparation of hard eggs as for 
"Egg Croquettes;" wet the border of the paste with 
a brush dipped in water or in beaten eggs, and double 
it over so as to form a half circle ; fry in hot fat and 
serve on a napkin. 

Royale Jaune pour Potage — Yellow Ciistard for Soups. 
Beat together four egg yolks and one whole egg, mix 
with one gill of cream, season with salt, cayenne 
pepper and grated nutmeg; fill up some small but- 
tered moulds, or one large mould, with the above 
preparation, and cook in the water bath as described 



Eggs, and Hoiv to Use Them. 123 

Miscellaneous Recipes — Continued 

under "Custard." When cooked and cold cut the 
custard in dice or fanciful shapes. 

Green Custard is made in the same manner, but col- 
ored with spinach green or green Breton coloring. 
Red Custard is colored by mixing a thick tomato 
puree with the eggs, but then a little less cream is 
used. 



124 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 



Egg Drinks. 



Egg Flip. 

Egg Flips can be prepared with different kinds of 
liquorSj to satisfy all tastes, we append several recipes : 

With Ale and Rum. — Heat one pint of ale ; when near- 
ly boiling put into a jug; while the ale is heating beat 
twelve whole eggs with two ounces of brown sugar and 
a wineglassful of rum, a little grated nutmeg and pow- 
dered ginger, and pour into another jug ; then add the ale, 
stirring all the time, and turn several times from jug to 
jug- 

With Beer.^-Four into a saucepan one gill of beer, 
three well beaten eggs, and two ounces of sugar; set on 
the fire, beat with an egg whisk until nearly boiling ; then 
add another gill of beer, a little nutrneg and ginger, and 
serve. 

With Milk and Brandy. — One teacupful of boiling 
ing milk mixed with the stiff froth of the white of an 
egg and a pony of brandy, stir well, and sweeten to taste. 

Egg Lemonade. 

Put the juice of one lemon, one ounce of sugar, the 
white of an egg and a small quantity of crushed ice into 
a tumbler, mix well with a shaker; add a little ice water, 
and drink with straws. The yolk of an egg may also be 
added if desired. 



Eggs, and How to Use Thepi. 125 

Egg Nog, Baltimore Style. 

Beat up the yolks of three eggs, and J4 of a nutmeg 
grated, with two ounces of powdered sugar, to the con- 
sistency of cream; add, pouring in quietly the while, yi 
gill of brandy or rum, and one glass of Marsala or brown 
sherry; add the whites of the eggs (beaten to a stiff 
froth), and, when well incorporated, gill of cream and 
pint of milk. This is not a warm drink and is easily di- 
gestible; it forms a nourishing dietetic beverage for de- 
bilitated persons. 

Egg Nog, Iced. 

Beat up the yolk of. one egg with a tablespoonful of 
water and the same of pounded white sugar; add one 
gill of sherry or half gill of brandy, ditto of rum, quarter 
pint of milk; mix together; add half gill of shaven ice. 

Egg Nog, Hot; or, "Auld Man's Milk." 

Heat a pint of Scotch. ale; add while warming, a pinch 
each of powdered cinnamon, grated nutmeg and pow- 
dered ginger; beat up the yolks of two eggs with a little 
brown sugar ; pour in the ale gradually ; when well amal- 
gamated add a glass of whiskey. 

Lait de Poule — Hen's Milk. 

The yolks of two eggs mixed with two ounces of pow- 
dered sugar and two tablespoonfuls of orange flower 
water ; beat up well and add half pint of boiling milk. 

Mulled Egg Wine. 

Beat up an egg with three glasses of sherry and a tea- 
spoonful of sugar; add some grated ginger, and careful- 
ly half pint of boiling water, stirring the while ; grate 
on a little nutmeg before serving. 



126 Eggs, and How to Use Them. 

Yolk of Egg Emulsion. 

Is made the same way, substituting the yolks of eggs 
for the whites; but being more sickly, it requires more 
flavoring. 

White of Egg Emulsion. 

Beat the whites of two fresh eggs with a few table- 
spoonfuls of milk or cream, half a teaspoonfiil of pow- 
dered gum-arabic and a small quantity of honey or sugar. 
This is very efficacious to swallow gently in sore throat. 



Eggs, and How to JJse Them, 127 



MuUed Wine, with Eggs. 

First, my dear madam, you must take 
Nine eggs, which carefully you'll break; 
Into a bowl you'll drop the white. 
The yolks into another by it. 
Let Betsy beat rhe whites with a switch. 
Till they appear quite froth*d and rich. 
Another hand the yolks must beat 
With sugar, which will make them sweet; 
Three or four spoonfuls maybe'Il do. 
Though some, perhaps, would take but two. 
Into a skillet next you'll pour 
A bottle of good wine, or more; 
Put half a pint of water, too. 
Or it may prove too strong for you: 
And while the eggs by two are beating, 
The wine and water may be heating; 
But, when it comes to boiling heat, 
The yolks and whites together beat. 
•With half a pint of water more — 
Mixing them well — then gently pour 
Into the skillet with the wine, 
And stir it briskly all the time. 
Then pour it off into a pitcher; 
Grate nutmeg in to make it richer; 
Then drink it hot, for he's a fool 
Who lets such a precious liquor cool. 



128 Eii^j i^^d How to Use Them. 



Books of Reference. 



The Deipnosophists Athenaeus 

Natural History Pliny 

Tabella Cibaria 

Healthj Improvements Dr. Muifet 

Popular Antiquities Brand 

The Pantropheon Soyer 

The Book About the Table Jeaffreson 

Antiquitates Culinarae Warner 

The Modern Cook de la Chapelle 

Two Fifteenth Century Cook Books 

The Accomplished Cook Mwy 

Art of Cookery Mrs. Glasse 

Culinary Chemistry Williams 

Animal Food Resources of the World. . . .Simmonds 

Chemistry of Common Life Johnston 

A Treatise on Food and Dietetics Pavy 

The Science of Nutrition Atkinson 

Historiographie de la Table Verdot 

Grand Dictionaire de Cuisine Dmnas 

La Cuisine d'Aujourdhui Dubois 

Meisterwerke der Speisen & Getraenke 

Bliiher & Petermann 

Le Cuisinier Imperial Viard 

Physiologie du Gout Brillat-Savarin 

Cooling Cups and Dainty Drinks Terrington